EnergyNeutralHome.pdf

Incidence in your region and array orientation and

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incidence in your region and array orientation and tilt angle. (see Photovoltaic systems ) Reducing carbon emissions depends on several factors listed in typical order of cost effectiveness when included in new housing and major additions: lifestyle emission reductions reduced house size (see The design process ) appliance efficiency using solar hot water with efficient gas or heat-pump backup (see Hot water service ) thermal efficiency (NatHERS rating) (see Passive solar heating ; Passive cooling ) heating/cooling and other appliance efficiency (MEPS star rating) (see Heating and cooling ; Appliances ) on-site (or community level) renewable energy generation (see Renewable energy ) smart grid interactive demand management and on- site storage systems, appliances and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (see Home automation ; Smart meters, in-home displays and smart appliances ). Apart from the first two factors, cost effectiveness varies according to house type and climate. For example, existing householders with limited or expensive thermal upgrade options may find upgrading of major appliances (heating, cooling and hot water service), followed by installation of PV to make up any shortfall, to be the most cost effective option for eliminating energy bills — particularly in more benign climates. In more extreme climates, higher NatHERS ratings usually deliver the most cost effective outcomes. RMIT found that in Melbourne across a 50 year time-horizon, Carbon zero, carbon positive
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450 Housing of the future an 8 star thermal performance with 3kW PV array and a solar hot water system provided cost optimal outcomes for achieving a carbon zero home (Moore et al. 2010). In existing homes, improve energy efficiency by adding insulation, shading and draught proofing, and zoning areas to be heated and cooled. Lifestyle emission reductions Actively operate your home to improve thermal comfort and reduce energy use: night purge by opening windows in summer open stairwell or clerestory (high) windows in summer for stack ventilation and close and insulate them in winter operate or erect shading in summer, retract or remove it in winter draw drapes at night limit ventilation and air movement in winter close doors to create a heating zone in winter and don’t heat unused rooms. Turn your thermostat up a few degrees in summer and down a few in winter to reduce your heating and cooling costs by around 20%. Buy efficient appliances when replacing them and reduce electrical appliance use, turn off lights, and switch off appliances and equipment at the plug when not in use — especially a second refrigerator. (see Appliances ) Switch to low greenhouse impact transport options like walking, cycling or public transport.
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