Course Hero Logo

Rememberthatanincreaseinnetworkingcapitalisacashoutflo

Course Hero uses AI to attempt to automatically extract content from documents to surface to you and others so you can study better, e.g., in search results, to enrich docs, and more. This preview shows page 13 - 15 out of 46 pages.

Remember that an increase in net working capital is a cash outflow and a decrease in net working capital is a cash inflow. This means that a negative sign in this table represents net working capital returning to the firm. Thus, for example, $16,500 in NWC flows back to the firm in Year 6. Over the project's life, net working capital builds to a peak of $108,000 and declines from there as sales begin to drop.We show the result for additions to net working capital in the second part of Table 10.8. Notice that at the end of the project's life there is $49,500 in net working capital still to be recovered. Therefore, in the last year, the project returns $16,500 of NWC during the year and then returns the remaining $49,500 for a total of $66,000 (the addition to NWC is $66,000).Page 350Finally, we have to account for the long-term capital invested in the project. In this case, we invest $800,000 at Time 0. By assumption, this equipment would be worth $150,000 at the end of the project. It will have an undepreciated capital cost of $150,995 at that time as shown in Table 10.6. As we discussed in Chapter 2, this $995 shortfall of market value below UCC creates a tax refund ($995 × 40 percent tax rate = $398) only if MMCChas no continuing Class 8 assets. However, we assume the company would continue in this line of manufacturing so there is no tax refund. Making this assumption is standard practice unless we have specific information about plans to close an asset class. Given our assumption, the difference of $995 stays in the asset pool, creating future tax shields.13 The investment and salvage are shown in the third part of Table 10.8.Page 351TOTAL CASH FLOW AND VALUE We now have all the cash flow pieces, and we put them together in Table 10.10. Note that an increase in net working capital is a cash outflow and a decrease in net working capital is a cash inflow, and that a negative sign shows working capital returning to the firm. In addition to the total project cash flows, we have calculated the cumulative cash flows and the discounted cash flows. At this point, it's essentially “plug and chug” to calculate the net present value, internal rate of return, and payback.
Click here for a description of Table 10.10: Projected Total Cash Flow, Power Mulcher Project.If we sum the discounted flows and the initial investment, the net present value (at 15 percent) works out to be $4,604. This is positive, so, based on these preliminary projections, the power mulcher project is acceptable. The internal or DCF rate of return is slightly greater than 15 percent since the NPV is positive. It works out to be 15.15, again indicating that the project is acceptable.14Looking at the cumulative cash flows, we see that the project has almost paid back after four years, since the cumulative cash flow is almost zero at that time. As indicated, the fractional year works out to be 95,706∕202,741 = .47, so the payback is 4.47 years. We can't say whether or not this is good since we don't have a benchmark for MMCC. This is the usual problem with payback periods.

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 46 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Fall
Professor
N/A
Tags

Newly uploaded documents

Show More

Newly uploaded documents

Show More

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture