Calculate the total cost per portion for all dishes

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  • AA 1
  • saank
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Calculate the total cost per portion for all dishes on your menu. Remember to include costsfor all components of a dish.Determine selling price for the menu. This price will be presented to the event organiser withthe menu for final approval.The conference centre aims to achieve an overall SFC% of 28% for buffet menus.All menu items and the overall menu price can be calculated manually or using computertechnology such as spreadsheet software.Answer all the questions.Attach copies of the following documents to your assessment.Your itemised recipe components list.All documents containing manual or computerised yield, cost and selling price calculationsto your assessor at the completion of Assessment A2.The final formatted version of your degustation menu.
Submit all completed menus, calculations, manual or computer-printed documents andrequired tasks for Task 2 to your assessor at the completion of Assessment A2.
Task 3: Develop and cost a cyclical menuYour work in an aged-care facility. You have to prepare a three-week cyclical menu for the residents forbreakfast, lunch and dinner. There are 150 residents in the facility.Breakfast includes a standardised range of cereals, juices, fruits and toast that are served every day. Youonly need to plan for one hot breakfast item. Hot egg-based breakfast items are limited to a maximum offour times in one weekly cycle. Only 50% of residents eat the hot breakfast option.Lunch is the main meal of the day. It consists of one entrée, a choice of two main courses and onedessert.Dinner is a lighter meal consisting of an entrée (often soup), a light, snack-style main meal and a fruit-based dessert. Portion sizes for the dinner main course are smaller than for lunch.The following factors must be considered when planning your cyclical menu.Menu items must be able to be prepared in bulk.The facility has set meal times. All meals must be able to be plated and served at that time.Some residents eat in their rooms. These meals are plated first, placed in insulated covers,arranged on pre-set trays and sent by trolley to their rooms.Many residents cannot eat very hard or crunchy items, such as whole nuts.Residents tend to eat smaller portion sizes. On average, portions are 20% smaller thannormal. For example, if the standard portion for beef casserole is 250 g, residents are serveda 200 g portion. A recipe that yields ten standard 250 g portions will yield 12.5 200 g portions.Menu items must be nutritionally balanced across a day and weekly cycle. Fruit, vegetablesand sources of fibre and calcium are important components in the residents’ diet.To keep costs down, the facility’s management encourages the use of frozen, pre-prepared orconvenience foods, for example, use of powdered soup bases. The facility has a budget of $18 per dayper resident for your menu. The costs for standard breakfast items (cereals, juices, etc.) are not includedin this price. This target does not have to be achieved on a daily basis as long as it averages out withineach week period of the three-week cycle.

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Term
Fall
Professor
NoProfessor
Tags
Menu bar, la carte

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