The trauma caused by separation from their families and children for black

The trauma caused by separation from their families

This preview shows page 7 - 8 out of 8 pages.

The trauma caused by separation from their families and children for black women detained in the criminal justice and mental health systems, especially for foreign national women whose families and children may live in a different country. Working in partnership with the black community To achieve better outcomes for black mentally disordered offenders, primary care trusts and mental health trusts should consider taking the following steps: Involving black community and mental health groups in the development and running of court-based diversion, liaison or assessment schemes. Ensuring local mentally disordered offenders’ steering groups include representation from a relevant local black mental health or community group, in order to include a black perspective on the development of strategic plans for services for mentally disordered offenders. Involving local black community and mental health group representation in Section 136 MHA monitoring groups. Encouraging the creation of an effective and authoritative association of black service users. Involving black health groups in a wide range of issues rather than solely with what are considered to be ‘black’ issues. 7
Image of page 7
Conclusion There is clearly a continued need for government departments and criminal justice and mental health agencies to tackle the many difficult issues that persist in the relationship between black communities, criminal justice and psychiatry. The key strategy documents of recent years have added little of substance to the material produced in the last two decades and many have avoided the focus of black mentally disordered offenders altogether. Not only is progress needed in the key areas mentioned above (eg rigorous ethnic monitoring in court diversion and criminal justice liaison schemes; greater black representation on scheme and section 136 steering groups; central monitoring of the ethnicity of black mentally disordered offenders; improved service delivery and better community engagement) but there is also a need for a concerted and inclusive strategy towards black and minority ethnic mentally disordered offenders which cohesively tackles the particular problems they experience in areas such as immigration, asylum and resettlement. Given that the criminal justice system can act as a gateway to the mental health system, the need for comprehensive action that reforms both systems is all the more pressing. The danger, if this does not happen, is that policy- makers in this field will find themselves perpetually addressing the symptoms rather than the causes of these inequalities. References 1 Fernando S (1991) Mental Health, Race and Culture London: Macmillan/MIND Publications 2 Department of Health (2003) Inside Outside: Improving Mental Health Services for Black and Minority Ethnic Communities in England London: Department of Health 3 Cope R (1989) ‘The Compulsory Detention of Afro-Caribbeans under the Mental Health Act’ New Community 15 (3) pp. 343-356 4 Healthcare Commission (2007) Results of the 2006 National
Image of page 8

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 8 pages?

  • Summer '16
  • Smith Eliud
  • It

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes