His focus tends to be on the differential diagnosis

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psychology and psychiatry. His focus tends to be on the differential diagnosis of  Borderline Personality Disorder, and Cauwels gives Gunderson's criteria in order of  their importance: Intense unstable relationships in which the borderline always ends up getting  hurt. Gunderson admits that this symptom is somewhat general, but considers it  so central to BPD that he says he would hesitate to diagnose a patient as BPD  without its presence. Repetitive self-destructive behavior, often designed to prompt rescue. Chronic fear of abandonment and panic when forced to be alone. Distorted thoughts/perceptions, particularly in terms of relationships and  interactions with others. Hypersensitivity, meaning an unusual sensitivity to nonverbal communication.  Gunderson notes that this can be confused with distortion if practitioners are not  careful (somewhat similar to Herman's statement that, while survivors of intense  long-term trauma may have unrealistic notions of the power realities of the  situation they were in, their notions are likely to be closer to reality than the  therapist might think). Impulsive behaviors that often embarrass the borderline later. Poor social adaptation: in a way, borderlines tend not to know or understand the  rules regarding performance in job and academic settings. The Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines, Revised Gunderson and his colleague, Jonathan Kolb, tried to make the diagnosis of BPD by  constructing a clinical interview to assess borderline characteristics in patients. The 
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DIB was revised in 1989 to sharpen its ability to differentiate between BPD and other  personality disorders. It considers symptoms that fall under four main headings: 1. Affect chronic/major depression helplessness hopelessness worthlessness guilt anger (including frequent expressions of anger) anxiety loneliness boredom emptiness 2. Cognition odd thinking unusual perceptions nondelusional paranoia quasipsychosis 3. Impulse action patterns substance abuse/dependence sexual deviance manipulative suicide gestures other impulsive behaviors 4. Interpersonal relationships intolerance of aloneness abandonment, engulfment, annihilation fears counterdependency stormy relationships manipulativeness dependency devaluation masochism/sadism demandingness entitlement
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The DIB-R is the most influential and best-known "test" for diagnosing BPD. Use of it  has led researchers to identify four behavior patterns they consider peculiar to BPD:  abandonment, engulfment, annihilation fears; demandingness and entitlement; 
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