W6A1 Key Assessment for Learning Objective 4.docx

The pathophysiology of the bubonic plague basically

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The pathophysiology of the bubonic plague basically involves two phases. These two phases include a cycle within the fleas and a cycle within humans. The key to the organism’s virulence is the blockage which aids the transmission of the bacteria by fleas. The prevalence of the bubonic plague in the United States between the years of 2010 and 2015 were 39 cases of human plague which resulted in 5 deaths. Half of the human plague victims were between the ages of 12 and 45. Most cases of the plague reported outside of the US were from countries in Asia and Africa. During the early 1990’s there were 12,998 cases of plague reported. The etiology of the bubonic plague was caused by the bacteria known as Yersinia pestis. The clinical manifestation of the bubonic plague is that it affects the lymph nodes. Within 3 to 7 days of exposure to the plague virus you will develop flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache, chills, weakness, and swollen tender lymph glands called buboes which means bubonic. The diagnosis of this plague is confirmed upon identifying Yersinia pestis organisms in a
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sample of blood or tissue from the infected person. The treatment of the plague is the use of antibiotics which are effective in treating plague. Antibiotics that can be used include ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, gentamicin, and doxycycline. People with plague are very ill and may require additional treatment, including oxygen, respiratory support, and medications to maintain adequate blood pressure.
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