The third observation is that there is little conscious thought seemingly being

The third observation is that there is little

This preview shows page 12 - 14 out of 14 pages.

The third observation is that there is little conscious thought seemingly beinggiven to find ways to link the product life cycle with the diffusion of innovation.A simple call for more studies, no matter how loudly or eloquently stated, willunfortunately not adequately address the criticisms and limitations so widelyshared. What seems to be needed is progress on two fronts. The first is anattempt to understand the phenomena that has made the product life cycleexplanation so intuitively appealing. And then proceed to an exploration ofwhether or not product life cycle, is indeed, the best model of that phenomena.This may possibly lead to a major reconceptualization of the concept.The second front seems to be research that focuses on the product life cycle asa dependent variable. Using historical data, it is important to start linking theproduct life cycle to marketing variables. But it is also important, to link thecycle to competitive as well as environmental variables.And then, some wise scholar will be able to start applying meta theory criteriato this concept, and hopefully discover that we have indeed moved wellbeyond viewing the product life cycle as a "vacuous" concept.BibliographyAnderson, C. R. and Zeithami, C. P. (1984), "Stage of the Product Life Cycle, Business Strategy,and Business Performance", Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 27, 1, pp. 5-24Arora.R. (1979), "How Promotion Elasticities Change", Journal of Advertising Research, 19(June) 3, pp. 57-62Barksdale, H. C. and Harris, C.E., Jr. (1982), "Portfolio Analysis and The Product Life Cycle",Long Range Planning, Vol. 15, 6, pp. 74-83Biggadike, E. R. (1981 ), "The Contributions of Marketing to Strategic Management", Academy ofManagement Review, Vol. 6, 4, pp. 621 -632Day.G.S. (1986), "Analysis for Strategic Market Decisions", St Paul, MN: West Publishing CompanyDay, G. S. (1981 ), "The Product Life Cycle: Analysis and Applications Issues", Journal of Marketing, 45 (Fall), pp. 60-67Dean, J. (1950), "Pricing Policies for New Products", Harvard Business Review, 28 (November/December), pp. 45-53Dhalla, N. K. and Yuspeh, S. (1976), "Forget the Product Life Cycle Concept!", Harvard BusinessReview, 54 (January/February), 1, pp. 102-112Dino, R. N. (1985), "Forecasting the Price Evolution of New Electronic Products", Journal of Forecasting, Vol. 4, 1, pp. 39-60Doland,R.J. and Jeuland,A.P. (1981), "Experience Curves and Dynamic Demand Models:Implications for Optimal Pricing Strategies", Journal of Marketing, 45 (Winter), pp. 52-56Enis, B.M., LaGarce, R. and Prell, A. E. (1977), "Extending the Product Life Cycle", BusinessHorizons, (June), pp. 46-56Farris, P. W. and Reibstein, D. J. (1979), "How Prices, Ad Expenditure, And Profits Are Linked",Harvard Business Review, 57 (Nov/Dec) 6, pp. 173-184229This content downloaded from 108.18.150.2 on Tue, 12 May 2020 20:55:46 UTCAll use subject to
Background image
Gillingham, D. W. (1985), "Marketing Expenditures: Investments or Expenses", ManagerialFinance, Vol. 11,1, pp. 16-22Hambrick, D. C., MacMillan, I. C. and Day, D. L. (1982), "Strategic Attributes and Performance inThe BCG Matrix—Based Analysis of Industrial Product Business", Academy of ManagementJournal, Vol. 25, 3, pp. 510-531
Background image
Image of page 14

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 14 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture