INDIRECT OBJECT He will give whomever he chooses the extra ticket OBJECT OF A

Indirect object he will give whomever he chooses the

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INDIRECT OBJECT: He will give whomever he chooses the extra ticket. OBJECT OF A PREPOSITION: We are proud of what we have accomplished . As these examples show, a noun clause is usually introduced by a word such as that, what, when , where, whether, who, whoever, whom, whomever, whose, or why. Sometimes, however, the word that introduces a noun clause may be omitted. EXAMPLE: She told me you won the election . [The introductory word that is understood. The noun clause is the direct object of the verb told .]
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8 EXERCISE 4: Identifying and Classifying Noun Clauses Underline the noun clause in each of the following sentences. Then, on the line before the sentence, tell how the noun clause is used in the sentence. Write s for subject, pn for predicate nominative , do for direct object , io for indirect object , or op for object of a preposition . EX: __op ___ Wanda has promised a reward to whoever finds her cat . _______ 1. What we need is an after-school recreation program. _______ 2. Dr. Donato said that she could meet with us next Tuesday. _______ 3. That Rita Morena is a talented actress has been proven by her many great performances. _______ 4. Would you please give whoever wants one, a ticket to the game? _______ 5. The art teacher always takes great interest in what we create. _______ 6. The coach will make whoever scores the most points the “Athlete of the Week.” _______ 7. How you can memorize poems so quickly really amazes me. _______ 8. My dentist told me I may need a filling. _______ 9. Will you tell me who sent these roses? ______ 10. Many people in the group believed that we should serve fried plantains at the dinner.
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9 Sentence Structure The structure of a sentence is determined by the number and types of clauses it has. 13f. According to their structure, sentences are classified as simple, compound, complex , or compound-complex . 1. A simple sentence has one independent clause and no subordinate clauses. It may have a compound subject, a compound predicate, and any number of phrases. S S V EXAMPLES: Kiki and Toni came to my house for dinner last night. S V V After dinner, the three of us compared our notes and outlined our report. 2. A compound sentence has two or more independent clauses and no subordinate clauses. A compound sentence is actually two or more simple sentences joined by a comma and a coordinating conjunction, by a semicolon, or by a semicolon and a conjunctive adverb such as therefore, however , or consequently. S V S V EXAMPLES: Kiki will write the first draft of the report, and Toni will revise it. S V S S V Kiki had some great ideas; Toni and I listened carefully. S V S V Toni is the best artist in the group; therefore, she will illustrate the report. 3. A complex sentence has one independent clause and at least one subordinate clause. S V S V EXAMPLE: After we discussed our plans, I felt eager to begin writing. [The first clause is subordinate, and the second clause is independent.
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10 4. A compound-complex sentence has two or more independent clauses and at least one subordinate clause.
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  • Winter '15
  • Scheller
  • English, Dependent clause, clause

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