Data coupling occurs when modules pass parameters or

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Data coupling occurs when modules pass parameters or specific data to each other. It is preferred. Control coupling occurs when modules affect the control flow of other modules Content coupling occurs when one module actually refers to the inside of another module. It is poor form.
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Create High Fan-In Fan-in describes the number of control modules that communicate with a subordinate. A module with high fan-in has many different control modules that call it. This is a good situation because high fan-in indicates that a module is reused in many places on the structure chart.
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Avoid High Fan-Out A large number of subordinates associated with a single control should be avoided. The general rule of thumb is to limit a control module’s subordinates to approximately seven for low fan-out.
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Coupling
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Program Specification Documents that include explicit instructions on how to program pieces of code There is no formal syntax for program specification Four components are essential for program specification Program information Events Inputs and outputs Pseudocode – a detailed outline of lines of code that need to be written.
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Program Specification
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Pseudocode A bit more structured than Structured English Pay close attention to data Introduce consistent variable tags Must reference, by name, all specific data elements Must be consistently represent data flows and elements on the physical DFD Decision and iteration conditions should be precisely defined (if/while) Can be automated by CASE tools
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Class Exercise Examine your D1 DFDs, how do you transition from logical to physical? What is your central process? What aspects of your system are manual? Automated? Hybrid? What code will you need to write?
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Wednesday Tickets.umbc.edu (univesitytickets.com) “Born on a College Campus” Readings Now: CH11, 12 Next: CH13
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D1 5 = Organization and problem statement 5 = Requirements gathering 10 = Use cases 25 = Narrative, DFD, logic 10 = ERD 5 = Alternatives & recommendation 20 = Feasibility (tech, econ, org, schedule) 10 = Requirements (functional & non-functional) 10 = Quality of writing and presentation
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Revise & resubmit process By the end of class, Friday (12/15) team may revise and resubmit D1 and/or D2 for consideration of a higher score (up to 50% of points lost on original) Must provide a change table , listing the section modified and the modification made. For example, 7.3 EconFeasibility = updated tangible costs, provided further description, re-ran analysis.
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Final Project Presentations Distillation of the main points of the project, focus on solution All team members must participate PPT (or PDF) of slide deck to Bb dropbox Instructor & Peer evaluation Content Convincing & compelling rationale, quality of design Presentation Timing breakdown 12 minutes to present 7 min Q&A 2 min evaluate & transition
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Final Project Presentations TOPIC MIN Introduce project team and project site details 0.5 Key findings from requirements gathering Detailed central problem / opportunity 1.0 Requirements for a solution 1.5
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  • Fall '08
  • Koru,G
  • data flow diagrams

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