Involved in how those ideologies benefit some but not

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involved in how those ideologies benefit some but not others, and using literacy to transform inequities that emerge within this process (Cervetti et al., 2001; Janks, 2013). The authors of this volume would interpret Obama’s message above as advocating a critical citizenry where students experience literacy practices that support their political involvement in a “radical democracy.” The use of popular culture benefits this latter set of educational goals. As chapter author William Reynolds argues, it is popular culture that creates “cracks” in the common sense, providing opportunities for readers to grapple with the complex and critical issues that arise in contemporary times. A critical reading of Obama’s message above would support a pedagogy of activism as the means to “shape the law” and the exemplars provided in this volume provide many examples of the effectiveness of a complex critical literacy in achieving habits of mind to accomplish productive social change as part of a rigorous, complex curriculum. REFERENCES Barthes, R. (1975). The pleasure of the text . Translated by Richard Miller. New York, NY: Hill. Carr, P., & Porfilio, B. (2011). The Obama education files: Is there hope to stop the neo-liberal agenda in education? Journal of Inquiry & Action in Education , 4 (1), 1-30. Cervetti, G., Pardales, M. J., & Damico, J. S. (2001, April). A tale of differences: Comparing the traditions, perspectives, and educational goals of critical reading and critical literacy. Reading Online , 4 (9). Available from: cervetti/index.html Giroux, H. (2013). Is there a place for cultural studies in colleges of education? In H. Giroux, C. Lankshear, & M. Peters (Eds.), Counternarratives: Cultural studies and critical pedagogies in postmodern spaces (pp. 47-58). Florence, KY: Routledge. Janks, H. (2000). Domination, access, diversity and design: A synthesis for critical literacy education. Educational Review , 52 (2), 175-186. Janks, H. (2013). The importance of critical literacy. In J. Pandya (Ed.), Moving critical literacies forward: A new look at praxis across contexts (pp. 31-44). Florence, KY: Routledge. Luke, A. (2013). Defining critical literacy. In J. Pandya (Ed.), Moving critical literacies forward: A new look at praxis across contexts (pp. 19-31). Florence, KY: Routledge. Luke A., & Freebody, P. (1990). Literacies programs: Debates and demands in cultural context. Prospect: Australian Journal of TESOL , 5 (7), 7-16. Morrell, E. (2004). Linking literacy and popular culture . Norwood, MA: Christopher-Gordon Publishers.
INTRODUCTION 5 Obama, B. (2014). Remarks by the president at Worcester Technical High School Commencement Ceremony. Retreived online: president-obama-speaks-worcester-technical-high-school#transcript Ravitch, D. (2012). David Coleman clarifies role of fiction in Common Core Standards.

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