The ability to understand and feel what another

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Theory and Practice of Group Counseling
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 2
Theory and Practice of Group Counseling
Corey
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The ability to understand and feel what another person is feeling. The listening process: Selecting, Attending, Understand, Remembering, and Responding. The levels of listening: Enjoyment, Information, Critical, Precision, and Empathic. Critical listening: Listening with the intent to judge or evaluate. Precision listening: Understanding substance and style for clues as to meaning. Empathic listening:
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Theory and Practice of Group Counseling
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 2
Theory and Practice of Group Counseling
Corey
Expert Verified
Listening to help others. Enjoyment listening: Listening for entertainment. Listening styles: People-oriented, action-oriented, content- oriented, and time-oriented. Listening barriers: Emotional noise, self-focus, and criticism. Language Adaptation: Making a decision to select a different word to add more emotion or subjective meaning; also adding exclamations or audile sighs or other sounds that are not complete words but also add emotion. Lesson 3 Nonverbal communication: Communication other than written or spoken language that creates meaning. Perception checking: Skill of asking other observers or the person being observed whether your interpretation of nonverbal behavior is accurate. Artifacts: Clothing or another element of appearance (e.g., jewelry, tattoos, piercings, makeup, cologne). Kinesics: Human movement, gesture, and posture. Emblem: A nonverbal cue that has a specific, generally understood meaning in a given culture and may substitute for a word or phrase. Illustrator:
A nonverbal behavior that accompanies a verbal message and either complements, contradicts, or accents it. Affect display: A nonverbal behavior that communicates emotions. Regulator: A nonverbal behavior that helps to control the interaction or level of communication between people. Adaptor: A nonverbal behavior that helps satisfy a personal need and helps a person adapt or respond to the immediate situation. Haptics: The study of human touch. Touch ethic: A person’s own guidelines or standards as to appropriate and inappropriate touch. Paralanguage (vocalic): Nonverbal aspects of voice (e.g., pitch, rate, volume, use of silence). Back-channel cue: A vocal cue that signals when an individual wants to talk and when he/she doesn’t. Response latency: The amount of time it takes someone to formulate a response to a statement or question in conversation. Proxemics: Study of how close or far away from people and objects an individual positions himself/herself. Territoriality: Study of how humans use space and objects to communicate ownership of space. Immediacy:
Feelings of liking, pleasure, and closeness communicated by such nonverbal cues as eye contact, forward lean, touch, and open body orientation. Arousal: Feelings of interest and excitement communicated by such nonverbal cues as vocal expression, facial expressions, and gestures. Dominance: Feeling of power, status, and control communicated by such nonverbal cues as relaxed posture, greater personal space, and protected personal space. Globalization: The integration of economics and technology that is contributing to a worldwide, interconnected business environment. Culture: A learned system of knowledge, behavior, attitudes, beliefs, values, and norms that is shared

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