All anticoagulant medications act on the body differently and a doctor should

All anticoagulant medications act on the body

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All anticoagulant medications act on the body differently and a doctor should always be consulted before changing from one anticoagulant to another, including switching to a generic version, avoid any health problems. Always consult your doctor or dentist before any procedures that may cause bleeding and obtain instructions for when and how to stop. If warfarin is being taken, discuss any new medications with your doctor. Many drugs and vitamins can change the efficacy of the medication. (American Heart Association [AHA], 2018, p. 1)
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z Treatment Regime: How it Impacts Clients Lifestyle Diet, Physical Activity, Sleep Patterns, Memory Clinical diagnosis and documentation through an EKG is required Patients should be aware of A. Fib symptoms and when to seek medical assistance (examples: fast heart beat, irregular heart beat, palpations, dizziness, confusion and signs of stroke) Patients may need to check their heart rate regularly after being instructed on how to do so To make sure patient clotting levels are safe, the doctor may require regular blood draws and may adjust the medications based on the results. Food restrictions may include: decreasing fried foods, decreasing red meat, low sodium diets,
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