Rancor against the gifted learned spiritually independent it detects in them

Rancor against the gifted learned spiritually

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spirit. Rancor against the gifted, learned, spiritually independent: it detects in them the well-constituted, the masterful. 155 (Spring-Fall 1887) In Buddhism this thought predominates: "All desires, all that produces affects and blood, draw one toward actions"-only to this extent is one warned against evil. For action-has no mean- ing, action binds one to existence: but all existence has no meaning. They see in evil a drive toward something illogical: to the affirma- tion of means to an end one denies. They seek a way of non- existence and therefore they regard with horror all affective drives. E.g., take no revenge! be no one's enemy!- The hedonism of the weary is here the supreme measure of value. Nothing is further from Buddhism than the Jewish fanaticism of a Paul: nothing would be more repellent to its instincts than this tension, fire, un- rest of the religious man, above all that form of sensuality that Christianity has sanctified with the name "love." Moreover, it is the cultured and even the overspirited orders that find satisfaction in Buddhism: a race satiated and wearied by centuries of philo- sophical contentions, not, however, beneath all culture, like the classes from which Christianity arose- Emancipation even from good and evil appears to be of the essence of the Buddhist ideal: 11 Cf. my footnote to section 29 of The Antichrist (Portable Nietzsche, p. 601).
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BOOK TWO: Critique of Highest Values 97 a refined state beyond morality is conceived that is identical with tbe state of perfection, in the presupposition that one needs to perform even good actions only for the time being, merely as a means-namely, as a means to emancipation from all actions. 156 (Nov. 1887-March 1888) A nihilistic religion [like Christianity J ,14 sprung from and appropriate to a people grown old and tame, having outlived all strong instincts-transferred step by step to another milieu, at length entering into youthful peoples which have not yet lived at all-very curious! The bliss of the close, the fold, the evening preached to barbarians and Germans! How thoroughly all that I lirst had to be barbarized, Germanized! To those who had dreamed a Valhalla: who found happiness only in wari-A su- pramational religion preached in a chaos where no nations even existed yet- 1:57 (Jan.-Fall 1888) The only way to refute priests and religions is this: to show that their errors have ceased to be beneficial-that they rather do harm; in short, that their own "proof of power" no longer ~olds good- 2. History of Christianity" 158 (1888) One should not confuse Christianity as a historical reality with that one root that its name calls to mind: the other roots from wbicb it has grown up have been far more powerful. It is an If The words I have placed in brackets are not found in the MS and were added by the German editors in 1906. Although this was expressly admitted in 1911, p. 501, Schlechta, who boasts of being faithful to the MSS, follows the standard editions, as usual.
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