The p stands for progressive scan which means the

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or 2160p). The "p" stands for progressive scan, which means the display device draws each line on the screen in order. This naming convention is primarily used by HDTVs. All flat-panel displays have a native resolution. The native resolution specifies both the number of physical pixels on the screen and the display's maximum resolution. The native resolution also specifies the resolution that should be used to achieve optimal image quality. Aspect ratio The aspect ratio is the proportion between the width and height of a resolution. Aspect ratios are used by both display devices and video content. The following are the three most commonly used aspect ratios: 4:3 is used primarily by analog TV broadcasts and older flat-panel and CRT displays. Common 4:3 resolutions include: o 800 × 600 (SVGA) o 1600 × 1200 (UXGA) 16:9 is a widescreen aspect ratio used by HDTVs, computer displays, and most production films. Common 16:9 resolutions include: o 1280 × 720 (WXGA) o 1920 × 1080 (FHD) o 3840 × 2160 (4K UHD) 16:10 is a widescreen aspect ratio used exclusively by computer display devices. Common 16:10 resolutions
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include: o 1680 × 1050 (WSXGA+) o 1920 × 1200 (WUXGA) Viewing angle The viewing angle specifies the optimal viewing area of the display device. Viewing angles are rated in degrees and specify both a horizontal and vertical threshold (e.g., 178°(H)/178°(V)). Response time Response time is a measurement, in milliseconds (ms), of how long it takes for a single pixel to turn on and off (go from black, to white, and back to black). Most manufacturers specify a grey-to-grey transition time instead of black- to-black. A response time of less than 5 ms is recommended for fast-moving graphics, such as movies or games. Response time is typically only used by displays that use LCD technology. Other display technologies have such fast response times (< 0.01 ms) that listing this specification is unnecessary. Refresh rate The refresh rate is the number of times the entire screen is redrawn per second. Refresh rates are measured in Hz. Most monitors support multiple refresh rates. Increasing the refresh rate reduces screen flicker. A desirable range of refresh rate is 60 Hz or higher. Fast-moving graphics require a refresh rate of 120 Hz or higher. The refresh rate must be supported by both the video card, the monitor, and the cable being used. By default, Windows only shows supported refresh rates. Brightness Brightness (also called luminance) identifies the amount of light a display is able to produce. Brightness is measured in candelas per square meter (cd/m 2 ), with a higher number indicating a brighter screen. A brighter screen istypically desired for mobile devices or for watching movies. Projectors use a brightness specification known as ANSI lumens. This is a measurement of the amount of visible light a projector is able to display on a screen.
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