The very erudite reader will soon rise to recite

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Essentials of Business Communication
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 1.13
Essentials of Business Communication
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oblectabunt atque animos serenabunt.The very erudite reader will soon rise to recite three poems, which will delight all the listeners(audience) and soothe their hearts.9. Nemo est cui iniuria placeat, ut nos omnes recognoscimus.There is no own whom injustice pleases, as we all recognize.10. Nisi vincula pati ac sub pedibus tyrannorum humi contundi volumus, libertati semperstudeamus et eam numquam impediamus.Unless we wish to endure chains (bondage) and to be crushed on the ground beneath the feet oftyrants, let us always strive for freedom and never impede it (stand in its way).11. Pauca opera mihi sedendo fiunt, multa agendo et experiendo.To me (In my estimation), few deeds are accomplished by sitting (inaction), (but) many by acting andtrying (taking action and making an attempt/trying things).12. Illa mulier mirabilis fructus amoris libenter carpsit et viro gratissimo nupsit.That amazing woman gladly harvested the fruits of love and married the very pleasant man.13.They are going to Rome to talk about conquering the Greeks.R˙mam eunt ut dGraec§s vincend§s (superand§s) loquantur (d§cantur).(Conceivably a studentmight use a gerund or gerundive with ador caus~to express the notion of purpose here, but Lat. wouldnot likely employ two gerundive phrases in a single clause; i.e., ad loquendum dGraec§s vincend§swould not be particularly good Lat. idiom.)14.By remaining at Rome he persuaded them to become braver.R˙mae (re)manend˙e§s persu~sit ut forti˙rs fierent.15.Who is there who has hope of doing great works without pain?Quis est qu§spem magn˙rum operum sine dol˙re agend˙rum (faciend˙rum) habeat?16.We urged the consul to save the state and preserve our dignity by attacking these injustices.C˙nsulem hort~t§sumus ut h§s iniªri§s oppugnand§s c§vit~tem serv~ret et dignit~tem nostramc˙nserv~ret.SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE1. Coniurationem nascentem non credendo corroboraverunt.They strengthened the rising conspiracy by not believing (it existed).2. Mali desinant insidias rei publicae consulique parare et ignes ad inflammandam urbem.Let the evil men cease to prepare their plot against the Republic and the Consul and (cease to prepare) fires for setting thecity ablaze.3. Multi autem propter gloriae cupiditatem sunt cupidi bellorum gerendorum. However many men are fond of waging war on account of their desire for glory.4. Veterem iniuriam ferendo invitamus novam.By enduring an old injustice we invite a new one.5. Curemus ne poena maior sit quam culpa; prohibenda autem maxime est ira in puniendo.Let us take care that the punishment is not greater than the offense; moreover, in punishing (when inflicting punishment)anger must especially be avoided.6. Syracusis captis, Marcellus aedificiis omnibus sic pepercit – mirabile dictu – quasi ad eadefendenda, non oppugnanda venisset.
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Essentials of Business Communication
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 1.13
Essentials of Business Communication
Guffey/Loewy
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