6 However this aspect of these scenes has another lasting and related impact on

6 however this aspect of these scenes has another

This preview shows page 6 - 9 out of 14 pages.

6
However, this aspect of these scenes has another lasting, and related, impact on the audience that is centered on class-consciousness.   The only commonality among the members of the fight club is that they are all, as Durden says, “an entire generation pumping gas, waiting tables; slaves with white collars… the middle children of history, man,” or, in other words, Marx’s present-day proletariat (in the sense that they are being exploited by their capitalistic society). These scenes successfully work to strip all other differences from the fighters so that they become essentially all the same.  Generally, a man’s occupation and, in a large part, status in his society is reflected in his clothing.  The stripping of the fighters’ shirts literally represents a stripping of any societal status or class that the members of the club had before entering, and will have after leaving the club. This is made even more apparent by the scene where Lou, the owner of Lou’s Tavern, attempts to disband the club.  He enters dressed in a nice suit, representing his wealth.  As Lou and Durden discuss the arrangement Durden previously made with the bartender to use the basement of the bar, the camera repeatedly pans over the members of the club, their uneasiness with the situation plastered on their faces.   Bob even tries to hide his unnatural breasts with his hands.   This intrusion of a man who defines himself by his social status and, in a communist sense by exploiting the members of the fight club (even the bartender was a member of fight club, although he was home with a broken collarbone during this scene), demonstrates to the audience the ills of class.  Each of the fight club scenes, and the scene with Lou in particular, instills within the audience an immediate 7
recognition of the class structure of capitalist societies and, eventually, an acceptance of Tyler Durden’s revolution against that structure.So,   what   exactly   is   Durden’s   revolutionary   stance?   Durden   is   primarily   a communist.   He is strongly against the consumerism and class structure he believes capitalism caused, reflected in his chosen occupation. A maker and salesman of soap, Durden, as the narrator explains, “[sells] rich women their own fat asses back to them.” Durden’s soap is made from fat he steals from a liposuction facility, so the soap is essentially used by the people who created the raw materials from which it is made. This philosophy is, in a large part, Marxian.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture