Feeding and eating disorders These disorders include disturbances related to

Feeding and eating disorders these disorders include

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Feeding and eating disorders. These disorders include disturbances related to eating, such as anorexia nervosa and binge- eating disorder. Elimination disorders. These disorders relate to the inappropriate elimination of urine or stool by accident or on purpose. Bedwetting (enuresis) is an example. Sleep-wake disorders. These are disorders of sleep severe enough to require clinical attention, such as insomnia, sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome. Sexual dysfunctions. These include disorders of sexual response, such as premature ejaculation and female orgasmic disorder. Gender dysphoria. This refers to the distress that accompanies a person's stated desire to be another gender. Disruptive, impulse-control and conduct disorders. These disorders include problems with emotional and behavioral self- control, such as kleptomania or intermittent explosive disorder. Substance-related and addictive disorders. These include problems associated with the excessive use of alcohol, caffeine, tobacco and drugs. This class also includes gambling disorder. Neurocognitive disorders. Neurocognitive disorders affect your ability to think and reason. These acquired (rather than developmental) cognitive problems include delirium, as well as neurocognitive disorders due to conditions or diseases such as traumatic brain injury or Alzheimer's disease. Personality disorders. A personality disorder involves a lasting pattern of emotional instability and unhealthy behavior that causes problems in your life and relationships. Examples include borderline, antisocial and narcissistic personality disorders.
Paraphilic disorders. These disorders include sexual interest that causes personal distress or impairment or causes potential or actual harm to another person. Examples are sexual sadism disorder, voyeuristic disorder and pedophilic disorder. Other mental disorders. This class includes mental disorders that are due to other medical conditions or that don't meet the full criteria for one of the above disorders. Your treatment team Your treatment team may include your: Family or primary care doctor Nurse practitioner Physician assistant Psychiatrist, a medical doctor who diagnoses and treats mental illnesses Psychotherapist, such as a psychologist or a licensed counselor Pharmacist Social worker Family members Medications Although psychiatric medications don't cure mental illness, they can often significantly improve symptoms. Psychiatric medications can also help make other treatments, such as psychotherapy, more effective. The best medications for you will depend on your particular situation and how your body responds to the medication. Some of the most commonly used classes of prescription psychiatric medications include: Antidepressants. Antidepressants are used to treat depression, anxiety and sometimes other conditions. They can help improve symptoms such as sadness, hopelessness, lack of energy, difficulty concentrating and lack of interest in activities. Antidepressants are not addictive and do not cause dependency.

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