Soc 344 Parenting _ Childhood 3 F 08

1 appeals advertisers use three types of pitches

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1. Appeals : advertisers use three types of ‘pitches’: fun/happiness (fast foods), taste/favor/smell
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1/30/11 4. Celebrities : The use of celebrities has as purpose to transfer the positive qualities of the celebrity to the product. Celebrities could be people or animated figures. Use of celebrities makes an ad more credible, validates child’s choices, and make the ad appear like a program. 4. Metaphors : The qualities of one object are transferred to another (ex: chewing gum that ‘taste like a rainbow’). It may increase understanding, familiarity and recall.
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1/30/11 6. Merchandising : efforts at building brand identity and loyalty with the intent to sell products Examples are Disney Club, spin-off merchandise from popular children’s programs, making the program an effective ad. 6. Pestering Parents : ads that directly encourage children to have their parents buy them a product that the ad makes it indispensable for their educational growth or social life. 6. Stereotyping : Ads contribute to how we think about other people. Children ads encourage gender roles and racial stereotyping.
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1/30/11 Americans spent $250 billion in 2005 on prescription drugs, more than they spent on gasoline or fast food, twice as much as they spent on education or new cars, more than the combined gross domestic product of Argentina and Peru. Almost 65% of the nation takes a prescription drug. Prescriptions kill on an average of 270 Americans per day. The nation spends as much to care for patients who were harmed by their prescriptions as it spends on those medicines in the first place. The “Medicalization” of Childhood
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1/30/11 Children’s Prescriptions : Since 1997, prescription spending for children has risen faster than spending for any other group, including seniors and baby boomers. Over-medicating Children : Medical researchers are also concerned that, increasingly, physicians and parents are overmedicating children aged 2 to 4. A study of 200,000 children, found that almost 2 percent of children were receiving stimulants (like Ritalin), antidepressants (like Prozac), or tranquilizers. Overall, about 4 percent of children aged 5 to 14 receive Ritalin. By age 20, children might be taking a range of potent drugs that have been tested only on adults. Antipsychotic drugs like Zyprexa and Risperdal are given as "quick fixes" to kids who "act out," and clonidine, a blood pressure medication, is now being given to children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and even to "sleep resistant" babies. Negative Side Effects : Many of the drugs have
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1/30/11 The Over-programming of Childhood Structured Childhood : Many children 12 and under lead very structured lives. Children today have 6 hours a week of free play time, compared with almost 10 hours in 1981. As a result, many children have much more hectic schedules than in the past.
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