a rhythm Instead of having the students memorize and give examples of rhythm a

A rhythm instead of having the students memorize and

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a. rhythm Instead of having the students memorize and give examples of rhythm, a fun, involving and memorable way to teach it would be to start by first reading a simple poem (such as a clap- ping game) aloud to the class in a natural way so that the class can become familiar with it, and then to re-read it, emphasizing the rhythm within the words. I could then involve the class by having them join in reading the poem while having students pair up and play the clapping game together, and instructing them that each clap is keeping the rhythm of the poem. MISS MARY MACK Miss Mary Mack, Mack, Mack All dressed in black, black, black With silver buttons, buttons, buttons All down her back, back, back She asked her mother, mother, mother For fifty cents, cents, cents To see the elephant, elephant, elephant Jump the fence, fence fence They jumped so high, high, high They touched the sky, sky, sky And didn't come back, back, back Till the fourth of July, July, July
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Page 7 of 22 EDCI 3000 Lesson 9 - Maryann Hoberman b. rhyme I think that a more enjoyable way to teach rhyme would be to utilize choral speaking. Choral speaking to rhyming phrases can be an effective way to teach rhyme because it involves the class as a group and is similar to singing, which kids are familiar with and enjoy. I think that a great poem for older students (5 grade or higher) to read aloud together while emphasizing rhyme would be "Rules for the Bus" because it deals with a situation that the kids are familiar with (riding the bus) as well as connecting with their feelings of having so many rules placed on them between home and school. After reading the poem together, we can go through each line and find the rhyming words at the ends of the lines and discuss why every line does not need to rhyme. RULES FOR THE BUS Said our driver in September as we climbed aboard the bus, “There are rules you must remember. Number one, you do not cuss. Do not squirm and do not wiggle. Do not squeak and do not squawk. Do not laugh and do not giggle. Better yet, don’t even talk. Do not ever let me catch you with your feet out in the aisle. Sit as rigid as a statue
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Page 8 of 22 EDCI 3000 Lesson 9 with a stiff and silent smile. And you will not wear your mittens, and you will not wear a mask. And you will not bring your kittens, and you shouldn’t even ask. And you will not play with bubbles or a yo-yo or balloon. And for causing me such troubles, you will get them back in June. Now the day is here. Begin it with the words I have to say. Kindly take a seat this minute, and let’s have a pleasant day.” Well, I listened very closely to the messages I heard, and in all this time I’ve mostly followed each and every word. I have tried to pay attention, but of this, I must confess: There’s a rule he didn’t mention, and today it caused a mess. It is not as if I planned it with an evil attitude.
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Page 9 of 22 EDCI 3000 Lesson 9 I am not that underhanded, and I don’t mean to be crude.
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  • Winter '17
  • Poetry, -Shel Silverstein, Ickle Me

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