Verse One single line of a poem arranged in a metrical pattern Also a piece of

Verse one single line of a poem arranged in a

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Verse : One single line of a poem arranged in a metrical pattern. Also, a piece of poetry or a particular form of poetry such as free verse, blank verse , etc., or the art or work of a poet.
–6– The popular use of the word verse for a stanza or associated group of metrical lines is not in accor- dance with the best usage. A stanza is a group of verses. Stanza : A division of a poem created by arranging the lines into a unit, often repeated in the same pattern of meter and rhyme throughout the poem; a unit of poetic lines (a “paragraph” within the poem). The stanzas within a poem are separated by blank lines. Stanzas in modern poetry, such as free verse, often do not have lines that are all of the same length and meter, nor even the same number of lines in each stanza. Stanzas created by such irregular line group- ings are often dictated by meaning, as in paragraphs of prose. Stanza Forms: The names given to describe the number of lines in a stanzaic unit, such as: couplet (2), tercet (3), quatrain (4), quintet (5), sestet (6), septet (7), and octave (8). Some stanzas follow a set rhyme scheme and meter in addition to the number of lines and are given specific names to describe them, such as, ballad meter, ottava rima, rhyme royal, terza rima , and Spenserian stanza. Stanza forms are also a factor in the categorization of whole poems described as following a fixed form. Rhetorical Question : A question solely for effect, which does not require an answer. By the implication the answer is obvious, it is a means of achieving an emphasis stronger than a direct statement. Example: Could I but guess the reason for that look? Example: O, Wind, If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind? Rhyme Scheme : The pattern established by the arrangement of rhymes in a stanza or poem, generally described by using letters of the alphabet to denote the recurrence of rhyming lines, such as the ababbcc of the Rhyme Royal stanza form. Capital letters in the alphabetic rhyme scheme are used for the repeating lines of a refrain; the letters x and y indicate unrhymed lines. In quatrains, the popular rhyme scheme of abab is called alternate rhyme or cross rhyme . The abba scheme is called envelope rhyme , and another one frequently used is xaxa (This last pattern, when working with students, is generally easier for them to understand when presented as abcb, as they associate matched letters with rhymed words). Enjambment : The continuation of the logical sense — and therefore the grammatical construction — beyond the end of a line of poetry. This is sometimes done with the title, which in effect becomes the first line of the poem. Form : The arrangement or method used to convey the content, such as free verse, ballad, haiku , etc. In other words, the “way-it-is-said.” A variably interpreted term, however, it sometimes applies to details within the composition of a text, but is probably used most often in reference to the structural charac- teristics of a work as it compares to (or differs from) established modes of conventionalized arrange- ments.

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