Is this a comedy why is it a comedy not too much

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Is this a comedy? Why is it a comedy? Not too much that’s really truly funny o Referred to a problem play; a play that addresses serious problems about society through the mode of comedy ° In much ado and taming: common themes Playful/seductive play of power When is seduction a tool of power or a tool of violence Ideal versus real love themes The community, and certain individuals, have very strong ideas of what love should be, and how love should look like, and how it should be played out in social circumstances o Regulation of love and courting in the community
° ° Government in England State power in the renaissance o The gov’ts in the English renaissances were way LESS powerful than most contemporary governments No standing army Few paid governmental employees Didn’t control very much of the gross domestic products (GDP); only about 3% of the total wealth that the monarch controlled o Governments had to rely on persuasion rather than coercion to regulate their citizens Teaching, preaching, writing, propaganda Contradicting the government was morally wrong, Un- Christian, and would result in divine retribution English government in the renaissance o Monarch (head of state) o Parliament Developed from a feudal system in which a monarch sought support form other nobility and landowners C. 1270 the English parliament became more formalized when Edward I sought to unite England into one state C. 1350= House of Lords (nobility) and House of Commons (knights and landowners) C. 1485-1649= parliament’s processes become more formalized, it has a permanent seat, it becomes more independent of the monarch 1649- Charles I executed Divine Rights of Kings (Monarchs) o Tried to inflate the power through this theory of the divine rights of kings o This theory aimed to instill obedience in citizens by explaining why everyone is religiously and morally obligated to obey they government o Using religion as a justification for political decisions o Basic claims:
God endows monarchs with celestial authority The monarch’s power comes directly from god The monarchs power does not come form the people; he/she is not accountable to them The king makes final decisions on all aspects of government, including the church Subjects can therefore not resist the orders of monarchs (the doctrine of non-resistances), but if the monarch’s orders directly contradict God’s commandments, the subject should disobey but also accept any penalty for disobedience James I—written during his reign o Published works in defense of royal power o Yet there was rising discontent as James I introduced additional taxes on imports and exports and ignored parliament’s wishes in religions and foreign policy ° ° Act I What kind of comment can this play be making about governance, via the Duke o Concerned about his image and how he would look if he changed his ruling now after being so lenient in the past o

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