In a frequency distribution the mode is interpreted strictly In the context of

In a frequency distribution the mode is interpreted

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In a frequency distribution, the mode is interpreted strictly. In the context of the form of a distribution, modality is interpreted more loosely.
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Example : The form of (b) would be described as bimodal, even though it is clear that there is only one value for the mode Skewness Skewness refers to the lack of symmetry of a distribution. If you drew a vertical line down from the mode of the symmetrical distribution to the right, you would produce two identical halves. If the halves are not identical, then the distribution is asymmetrical, or skewed. A distribution may be positively or negatively skewed Kurtosis Kurtosis refers to how peaked a distribution is. It is possible for two distributions to be the same in terms of their modality and skewness and yet to differ in their kurtosis. Distributions can be classified according to how peaked they are: Leptokurtic : The distribution is very peaked, and variable scores are more tightly clustered. Platykurtic : The distribution is flat, and variable scores are more widely dispersed.
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Mesokurtic : The distributions is moderately peaked, and variable scores are somewhat spread out. Charts and Graphs Charts and graphs are visual displays of how the scores on a variable are distributed. Charts and graphs do not provide new information about a distribution of variable values; rather, they simply display the information in pictorial form. Pie charts begin with a circle that represents the entire distribution of scores on a variable. Each wedge of a pie chart represents an attribute (category) of a variable, and the size of each wedge is proportional to the frequency of scores in that category as a percentage of all scores in that distribution (sample). Effective pie charts generally have no more than about six wedges. Bar charts can be used to illustrate information for a categorical variable.
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