Their omaha platform called for both political and

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Their Omaha platform called for both political and economic reforms:
Politically, it demanded an increase in the power of common voters through:(1) direct popular election of U.S. senators (instead of indirect election bystate legislatures)(2) the use of initiatives and referendums, procedures that allowed citizens to vote directly on proposed laws.Economically:(1) unlimited coinage of silver to increase the money supply (2) a graduated income tax (the greater a person's income, the higher the percentage of the tax on his or her income)(3) public ownership of railroads by the U.S. government(4) telegraph and telephone systems owned and operated by the government(5) loans and federal warehouses for farmers to enable them to stabilize prices for their crops(6) an eight-hour day for industrial workersThe Election of 1892:James Weaver of Iowa:the Populist candidate for presidentwon more than 1 million votes and 22 electoral votesthe Populist ticket lost badly in the South and failed to attract urban workers in the North (african americans were scared because of things like kkk).The two major parties provided a rematch between President Harrison and former president Cleveland. This time, Cleveland won a solid victory in both the popular and electoral vote. Depression PoliticsPanic of 1893stock market crasheddozens of railroads went into bankruptcy as a result of overbuildingdepression continued for almost four years.Gold Reserve and Tariff:A decline in silver prices encouraged investors to trade their silver dollars for gold dollarsgold reserve fell to a dangerously low levelCleveland repealed the Sherman Silver Purchase Actfailed to stop the gold drain.borrowed $65 million in gold from J. P. MorganWilson-Gorman Tariff in 1894:(1) provided a moderate reduction in tariff rates(2) included a 2 percent income tax on incomes of more than $2,000.Jobless on the March:led by Populist Jacob A. Coxey of Ohio. "Coxey's Army" demanded that the federal government spend $500 million on public works programs to create jobs.
William H. HarveyWrote Coin's Financial Schooltaught millions of discontented Americans that their troubles were caused by a conspiracy of rich bankers, and that prosperity would return if the government coined silver in unlimited quantities. Turning Point in American Politics: 1896

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