The theory Rogerss proposed was that a client was reluctant when asked direct

The theory rogerss proposed was that a client was

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The theory Rogers’s proposed was that a client was reluctant when asked direct questions or became defensive. Reflective listening has been practiced, in which the counselor actively reflects the client’s emotions sympathetically and accurately (Lee, 2011). Therapists have argued the importance of acknowledging their own openness and awareness. The classical person-centered approach argued that genuine actions and words from the therapist should be in line with experiences and thoughts. This was a way for the therapist to be present within the counseling session in which genuine actions have effective benefits to the client producing a therapeutic alliance (Anderson, 2001).
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PERSON-CENTERED AND CLASSICAL ROGERIAN 9 Therapists working successfully have been thought to possess all three core conditions (Cornelius- White, 2008). Rogers’s hypothesized that unconditional positive regard during the therapeutic process would lead to client growth. Elliott and Freire (2007) argued, “If the therapist, instead of attempting to change the client, strives to accept the client unconditionally, change will follow naturally” (p. 286). During the therapeutic process counselors who practiced genuinely with unconditional positive regard and empathic understanding aided the client in feeling accepted (Elliott & Freire, 2007). Research from the Wisconsin project Rogers worked on, showed that clients who perceived that the counselor was acting with genuine unconditional positive regard did change (Quinn, 2015). After the Wisconsin project the philosophical approach to unconditional positive regard was that if a person has felt fully accepted he cannot help changing. In the sessions the counselor was a genuine alter ego to the client in distress and becomes a nurturing companion/ active listener (Anderson, 2001). Therapeutic Relationship. During the therapeutic process, the client and counselor have created an alliance based on trust (Corey, 2013). According to Anderson (2001), every therapeutic alliance should be unique as each client has his own individual needs. The conversations between the client and counselor aided in solving the problem (Corey, 2013). When an alliance has been established the client can feel he has power. Basic trust in the client’s knowledge of self, that he has an understanding of what is wrong and can make his own goals, was the foundation of nondirective therapy; therefore, the therapist has no need to direct the client (Kirschenbaum, 2012). Due to person-centered drifting from an analytical approach and clients having the ability to make their own choices, the approach has become about empowering the individual (Johnson, 2011). Clients being empowered have the right to make their own choices, and the goal has been to increase self- determination regarding decisions in life (Jacobs,
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PERSON-CENTERED AND CLASSICAL ROGERIAN 10 2015). A healthy and successful alliance depended upon the therapist ensuring a nonjudgmental environment where the client felt free to express emotions which were empathically reflected by the therapist. Within session the therapist maintained an indirect and non-authoritarian approach (Lee, 2011).
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