Lets make this a little bit bigger so we can see what

Info icon This preview shows pages 43–45. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Let's make this a little bit bigger so we can see what we're working with. Now the commands I need to be run need super user access to the system and I'm currently logged in as my rtracy user and rtracy's just a standard user, therefore before I can run these commands I need to switch to my root user account. Root is the superuser on a Linux system and I do this using the su - command and then I enter the root user's password. df Command 0:53-3:32
Image of page 43

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The first command I want to show you is the df command, the df command will tell you how much disk space is being consumed on each of the files systems on your Linux system. Now if you just run df without any options the output will be formatted in terms of consumed blocks which is fine but you have to do a lot of math to configure out how many megabytes and gigabytes that actually translates to. Therefore a good option to use with the df command is the -h option which formats the output in human readable form, that's what h stands for. If I press enter I can now see how much space is being used by each of the file systems on this system. Over here on the left we can see each individual file system, we can see how big those file systems are, we can see how much space is already been consumed on those file systems, how much space is still available and then we can usage statistics in terms of percent of available space and over here we can see where that file system is mounted in the directory tree structure. For example over here we have a file system called /dev/sdb1 now understand on Linux each of your disks and partitions are identified using a device file and these device files are stored in the /dev directory and each disk and each partition has its own device file and you can tell which disk or partition we're talking about by looking at the name. First of all, all your storage devices file names will begin with sd, stands for storage device. Where you want to start looking is the third character right here. In this case we have a b. B indicates that this is the second hard disk drive in the system. Notice up here we have /dev/sda this indicates that this is the first hard disk drive in the system while this is the second and then the last character identifieswhich partition on that storage device we're talking about. In this I have the second storage device in the system and it is the first partition on that device, in fact it's the only partition on that device. Over here we can see how big that device is, how big that partition is, it's 16 gigabytes of which 181 megabytes are currently used so there's still 15 gigs free on this file system. 2% of the available space is been consumed and that partition is actually mounted in the /mnt/shared direction in the file system. In fact if we come over here to activities and click on our file browser and go to computer and then go to the /mnt directory and then to the shared directory we can actually see the files that are stored on this partition because this partition is mounted in this directory.
Image of page 44
Image of page 45
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern