is ultimately the end user or customer because the process that delivers the

Is ultimately the end user or customer because the

This preview shows page 36 - 39 out of 85 pages.

is ultimately the end user, or customer: because the process that delivers the product is efficient, its costs are minimized and its quality is optimized. The customer, in other words, gets a higher-quality product at a lower price. Supply Chain Management As you can see in Figure 9.10 "A Simplified Supply Chain", the flow that begins with the purchase of raw materials and culminates in the sale of the Marshmallow Peeps to end
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37 users is called the supply chain. The process of integrating all the activities in the supply chain is called supply chain management (SCM). As you can see from our discussion so far, SCM requires a high level of cooperation among the members of the chain. All parties must be willing to share information and work together to maximize the final customer‘s satisfaction.[8] Figure 9.10 A Simplified Supply Chain Managing your supply chain can be difficult, particularly if your company has large seasonal fluctuations. [9]This is certainly true at Just Born. Even though it has a Marshmallow Peep for every season (heart Peeps for Valentine‘s Day, spooky Peeps for Halloween, patriotic Peeps for July Fourth, and so on), the biggest problem rests with the standard yellow Marshmallow Peep that provides a major spike in sales each spring. Without careful supply chain management, there would be either too many or two few yellow Marshmallow Peepsboth big problems. To reduce the likelihood of either situation, the manager of the company‘s supply chain works to ensure that all members of the chain work together throughout the busy production season, which begins each fall. Suppliers promise to deliver large quantities of ingredients, workers recognize that they will be busy through February, and dealers get their orders in early. Each member of the chain depends on the others to meet a mutually shared goal: getting the right quantity of yellow Marshmallow Peeps to customers at the right time.
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38 But what if a company has multiple sales spikes (and lulls)? What effect does this pattern have on its supply chain? Consider Domino‘s Pizza. Have you ever thought about what it takes to ensure that a piping-hot pizza will arrive at your door on Super Bowl Sunday (Domino‘s busiest day of the year)? What about on the average weekend? How about when the weather‘s bad and you just don‘t want to go out? Clearly, Domino needs a finely tuned supply chain to stay on top of demand. Each year, the company sells about four hundred million pizzas (more than one pizza for every man, woman, and child in the United States). Its suppliers help to make this volume possible by providing the company with about one hundred fifty million pounds of cheese and toppings. Drivers do their part by logging nine million miles a week (the equivalent of 37.5 round trips to the moon every week).
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