Command mode essentials h move cursor left j move

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Command Mode - Essentials h move cursor left j move cursor down k move cursor up l move cursor right x delete character dw delete word dd delete line ZZ write and quit
Command Mode con’t / regexpr search forward ? regexpr search backwards n repeat last search (ie, find next result) N repeat last search, in opposite direction n G Jump to line n (omit n to go to last line)
Last Line Mode Essentials w write file q quit w! write read-only file q! quit without saving changes e filename opens a file for editing sh open a shell ! command open a shell, run a command, then exit the shell .! command open a shell, run a command, exit the shell, placing the standard output into the work buffer Can also do !! command from Command Mode
Buffers Contains recently edited or deleted text It’s where undo information is stored You can copy (yank) text to this buffer and then paste (put) it elsewhere Similar to the General Purpose Buffer Does not contain undo info only contains text if you put it there Each of the 26 buffers is referenced by letter a-z Numbered 1-9 Read only Contain most recently deleted chunks of data greater than one line long You can paste (put) from these buffers and use them for undoing deletes General Purpose Buffer Named Buffers Numbered Buffers
yank Copies lines of text To yank a line, use yy OR – use Y (it’s shorter) To yank multiple lines, place cursor on the first line and use n Y, where n is the number of lines to yank By default it yanks text to the General Purpose Buffer To place in a named buffer, precede the yank command with double quotes and the letter of the buffer you wish to use Use lowercase letter to overwrite, upper case to append Example, yank 5 lines into buffer c "c5Y
put Pastes text from a buffer into the Work Buffer Use p to put below current line Use P to put above current line Again, if using a named buffer, precede with double quotes and the letter
CST 8102 Operating System Fundamentals (GNU/Linux)
Linux Filesystem A filesystem is a collection of directories and files. A Unix/Linux system usually contains more than one filesystems. Each filesystem does not have to exist on a single hard disk. One hard disk may contain several filesystems or a single filesystem may be spread across multiple hard disks
Linux Filesystem A filesystem is the logical means for the O/S to store and retrieve data on available storage mediums create, move & delete files and directories ( touch mkdir cp mv rmdir rm ) modify filename ( mv ) open files for reading and writing ( vim ) Search for files ( find ) seek within a file ( grep ) list content of a directory ( ls ) etc...
Linux Filesystem These basic functions are common to most operating systems. However, how they are implemented and managed can differ drastically from one O/S to another, and can also impact on the effectiveness of the filesystem.

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