The roman religion did not rule out other faiths but

This preview shows page 17 - 20 out of 26 pages.

The Roman religion did not rule out other faiths but adopted them . The Romans absorbed religious influences from the peoples whose land they occupied, and the difference between them and these peoples became blurred. The origins of most Roman gods and goddesses were in foreign religions, such as the Etruscan, Greek, Egyptian and Persian . The twelve gods who were particularly honoured by the Romans were Jupiter, Juno, Minerva, Vesta, Ceres, Diana, Venus, Mars, Mercury, Neptune, Vulcan and Apollo. The Composite order
Romans adopted the Greek gods, but gave them an entirely different character. The gods were not only objects of worship, but were also presumed responsible for the existence of law and justice in the world. Denial of the gods was perceived as denial of justice. Roman religion was open to all peoples, regardless of religion, race or sex. Religion was intended to serve the interests of the state and ensure its prosperity. Influenced by the Etruscans and Greeks, the Romans built temples for the gods and offered sacrifices to them. E. Roman Temples In Rome, like in Greece, the temple was not a gathering place for believers, but a "home" to the god or the statue that represented him . The temple was the place where people could contact the god . Believers came to the temple to pray, bring offerings, sacrifices, hear what was in store for them or win a miracle. The temples also served for keeping the sacred objects and remains of the Roman nation . Usually there was an inner room in the temples where valuables, memoranda of priests and other important documents were kept. Following the Etruscans and Greeks, the Romans placed statues of the gods in the temples . A deep portico in the Roman temple led to a cella (a room in the temple where stood the statue of the god to whom the temple was dedicated) or, in elegant temples, to three sacred rooms, located side by side. Unlike the Greek temple, which was surrounded on all sides by a staircase, the emphasis in the Etruscan temple was on the front, which faced one direction. The Roman temple was built on a high podium, and dominated the space in front of it. The front was emphasized by a great staircase , as was the front of the Etruscan temple. Unlike the Greek temple, to which it was possible to enter from any direction, the access to the Roman temple was from one direction through a staircase . The columns of the Roman temple do not surround the structure like in the Greek temple, but some are adjacent to the side walls and the rear exterior wall of the cella. These were fake columns. Thus, the Roman temple was directed to a particular direction , a feature which was foreign to the Greek temple. In Rome, like in the Hellenistic East, luxury in architecture lied in marble. The best example of a Roman temple from the period of Augustus is Maison Carrée (literally in French: square house), which was built in the Roman city Nemansus in southern France, Nîmes today. This is a small Corinthian temple, built during the years 19-12 BCE to 1-2 CE, on a podium at a height of 3.5 meters. A staircase and portico lead to the only one entrance in the west. Half columns are adjacent to the side walls and the exterior walls of the cella in
the rear.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture