Psittacine circoviral beak and feather disease

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Psittacine Circoviral (beak and feather) Disease affecting endangered psittacine species; Infection of amphibians with chytrid fungus resulting in chytridiomycosis. This chapter identifies and discusses threats to threatened species and the native biodiversity of King Island. Relevant Key Threatening Processes have been included for discussion as a threat. Ratings of the impact of each threat to individual species are available in Appendix 3. Priority threats and actions to minimise the threats are outlined in Chapter 5. 4.2 The past European settlement of King Island began in the early 1800s, with the arrival of sealers. Permanent settlement and land clearing for agricultural development began in 1888 and increased after the First World War, when farms were developed for soldier settlers (Finzel 2004). After the Second World War heavy machinery was brought in for large-scale clearing, and wide-scale burning added to the removal of the original vegetation. The expansion of agriculture on King Island has continued to today, the result being a highly fragmented and developed landscape, with large areas of productive pasture used for grazing of the beef and dairy cattle. Figure 3 provides an aerial composite image of the King Island landscape. Permanent settlement and development of King Island has had an enormous impact on the biodiversity. Vegetation clearance, logging, fire and hunting have permanently changed the landscape and ecology – about a third of the Island now supports native vegetation. Species that are now presumed extinct on the Island are numerous and include for example Emus, Wombats, Southern Sea Elephants, Tiger Cats, celery-top pine, coast banksia and sticky long-heads (Barnes et al. 2002). In addition some species that are widespread elsewhere have become uncommon on King Island, and as discussed in Chapter 3, a number of species are listed as threatened on either the EPBC or TSP Acts . King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 21
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Figure 3. Aerial map of King Island (5 December 2006) King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 22
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4.3 Known and potential threats to King Island’s biodiversity Existing or potential threats have been identified and assessed for their impact on King Island’s native biodiversity, as described below. Some threats are poorly understood or there is little data from which to quantify their degree of impact. Complicating the matter is that whilst threats have been noted individually, there may be cumulative effects due to strong links and synergies between many threats, resulting in cumulative impacts to species, communities and the King Island ecosystem. For example the high wallaby population is linked to the highly fragmented landscape, with extensive areas of productive agricultural pasture that has resulted in a high abundance on the Island. The actions identified within Chapter 5 reflect the relationship between threats and between species to encompass a holistic approach to biodiversity management.
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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