Pitfall your supervisor doesnt support the proj ect

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Pitfall: Your supervisor doesn’t support the proj- ect. Recommendation: Share the charter with your supervisor and ask him or her to sponsor the proj- ect. Depending on the complexity of the project, the sponsor may be called on to remove barriers or pro- mote the project to other departments. Every project needs a sponsor to champion the work. Invite the sponsor to the first team meeting and allow him or her to articulate the problems and goals to the team. Do After the planning step has been completed, the team moves on to “do.” This step allows the team to try out and test specific changes. It also gives the team a chance to energize peers by helping them see for themselves the future state. Copyright © 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.
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Performance potential 52 November 2012 • Nursing Management Pitfall: The team is unable to vi- sualize the future state. Recommen- dation: Help team members envi- sion what success will look like by having them map out step by step the new and improved process. You can also have team members brain- storm what differences they expect to see after the change is success- fully implemented. This will also help the team stay focused on the end goal. Pitfall: The tryout or pilot of the solution failed. Recommendation: Explain to the team that just because the change looks good on paper, doesn’t mean it will go as planned in the work setting. There will always be details that were overlooked, and it’s okay if some- thing didn’t work as planned. Team members will need to physically walk through the process and discuss the challenges to help them identify nuances and make changes before implementing the solution. Pitfall: The team hasn’t devel- oped a way to measure success. Recommendation: It’s very difficult to know if the solution was success- ful if the process hasn’t been mea- sured. Measuring before and after can be by observations, surveys, or another form of data collection such as chart reviews. Pitfall: Peers haven’t bought into the solution. Recommendation: Team members have the opportu- nity to work through their anxiety about change during improvement meetings, whereas their peers don’t have this advantage. Team members need to bring their peers along on the improvement journey through regular updates and allowing their peers to ask questions, as well as providing feedback about the change. Remember, it’s normal to be unsettled about change.
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  • Fall '17
  • Management, Lippincott Williams, Rapid Cycle Improvement

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