Released chemotactic factors attract neutrophils eosinophils monocytes all of

Released chemotactic factors attract neutrophils

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Released chemotactic factors attract neutrophils, eosinophils & monocytes all of which begin to perform phagocytosis. Neutrophils will show up at the site of injury in 6-8 hours and monocytes will show up in 1-7days. They each are responsible for phagocytosis. They will eventually die and rupture releasing their intracellular contents. This also triggers the release of the acute phase reactants. Mast cell degranulation is the major step of the inflammatory cascade and has an effect on every other aspect of the inflammatory cascade. Mast cell degranulation leads to the additional activation of the acute phase reactants which are the coagulation proteins, kinin and complement, but this is not depicted on the diagram. I simply want you to know that mast cell degranulation also triggers the activation of the acute phase reactants. Mast cell degranulation results in the release of four main items: histamine, cytokines, leukotrienes, & prostaglandins. Histamine is responsible for causing vasodilation, it increases vascular permeability, it increases blood flow to the site of injury which ultimately causes erythema and swelling at the site of injury. Cytokines can react quickly or may be more delayed. IL 4 is released early in inflammation and IL13 is released later in the inflammatory response. TNF is released during early and late inflammation. They each have their functions which you can review on the concept map.
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  • Fall '15
  • david,mary

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