Identify the location and describe the functional

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Identify the location and describe the functional significance of the following structures:
processor, and this is important to the development and use of language. Specifically, communication skills are thought to be more the territory of the left caudate and the thalamus. Each of the brain's hemispheres contains a caudate nucleus, and both are located centrally and near the basal ganglia. They are situated near the thalamus. Each nucleus features a wide head that tapers into a body and a thin tail. As a whole, it is curved and often resembles the letter "C" in shape. Cerebellum : The cerebellum is located at the base of the brain, just above the brain stem, where the spinal cord meets the brain, and is made of two hemispheres. The cerebellum receives information from the sensory systems, the spinal cord, and other parts of the brain and then regulates motor movements. The cerebellum coordinates voluntary movements such as posture, balance, coordination, and speech, resulting in smooth, balanced muscular activity. It is also important for learning motor behaviors. It is a relatively small portion of the brain -- about ten percent of the total weight, but it contains half the brain's neurons. The cerebellum is not unique to humans. Evolutionarily speaking, it is an older portion of the brain, as it is present in animals that scientists believe evolved before humans. Damage to the cerebellum, while not causing paralysis or intellectual impairment, would contribute to a lack of balance, slower movements, and tremors. Complex physical tasks would become unsteady and halting. Cerebral aqueduct: The cerebral aqueduct (of Sylvius) is the structure within the brainstem that connects the third ventricle to the fourth. It is located within the midbrain, surrounded by periacqueductal grey matter (PAG) with the tectum of midbrain located posteriorly and the tegmentum anteriorly. It is filled with CSF and its obstruction leads to obstructive hydrocephalus with dilatation of the lateral and third ventricles only. Cerebrum: The cerebrum, also known as the telencephalon, is the largest and most highly developed part of the human brain. It encompasses about two-thirds of the brain mass and lies over and around most of the structures of the brain. The outer portion (1.5mm to 5mm) of the cerebrum is covered by a thin layer of gray tissue called the cerebral cortex. The cerebrum is divided into right and left hemispheres that are connected by the corpus callosum. Each hemisphere is in turn divided into four lobes. The cerebrum or telencephalon, along with the diencephalon comprise the two major divisions of prosencephalon (forebrain). The cerebrum is involved in several functions of the body including: Determining Intelligence Determining Personality Thinking Perceiving Producing and Understanding Language Interpretation of Sensory Impulses Motor Function Planning and Organization Touch Sensation

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