Planogram a map of where every product goes on a

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Planogram A map of where every product goes on a retail store shelf. Explained: Rather than have each store manager figure out which items go on which shelf, chains can develop planograms for each product category. This creates incredible efficiencies and also creates continuity for the customer experience from one store in that chain to another. 4 Store security issues Each retail store must utilize personnel, technology, lighting, surveillance systems, locked storage units, etc. to protect those things that the company and its
SCM 300 – MODULE 05 Study Packet customers value. Stores are responsible for protecting; Employees- Managers, store employees, potentially vendors. Store Assets- inventory cash, store property Customers and their Assets- store visitors, their cars, and also any other personal property Data- company, customer, and vendor data Explained: Modern retailers have large sophisticated security teams at both the corporate and store level that work closely with law enforcement. They should also work with vendors to maintain security. In the last few years data was hacked through vendors in order to access retail store data. Goal of waiting line management Balance the cost paid by the customers (time) with the cost paid by the company (money paid to maintain the system.) Explained: In a waiting line system everyone pays. Every decision made by a manager shifts payments toward customers or toward the company. More employees equals shorter line but costs the company more to keep lines short. Parts of a waiting line system Made up of 3 parts; Input source- this is the population of people that might want service Waiting line- the area in which customers wait for service Service facility- the area in which customers actually receive service Explained: Customers (input source) move from being outside of the system to entering the system where they might need to wait in a line. Once a server is available they will move from the line into the service area. 4 Managerial Considerations in Queues Customers- How many are there? How quickly are they arriving? The Waiting Lines- What type of lines? How many lines? Employees- Who’s working in the system? How many? Skill level and speed? Service Facilities- How effective and efficient is the process? Tools? Managers have the ability to manage all of these factors. By changing prices, hours of operation, increasing training, upgrading technology, adding more lines, etc. a manager has the ability to impact customer and employee satisfaction, employee efficiency, and many other issues that impact the proficiency of the waiting line system. Basic waiting line terminology Queue -Line Channel -Line. Here it often refers to the number of lines available at each step. Phase - A single step in the process. Example: Phases in college enrollment; application, registration, orientation, scheduling.

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