Of 18 additional items that should be considered in

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of (18) additional items that should be considered in preparing an EAP (Rener, 2013). These items include: the roles and responsibilities, procedures specific to each type of emergency, aiding people with disabilities, training, documentation, inspection and maintenance of building life safety features, drills, and post planning. Workplace emergency practices should be conducted regularly no matter how big or how small the organization. Practicing will define the roles and responsibilities of each employee during an emergency, to ensure the safety of everyone. Additionally, practicing will help identify any potential hazards and help address different emergency situations as it relates to the facility. Upon completion of the Washington Distribution Warehouse, consideration should be placed on developing a written plan, procedures and work practices that meet both NFPA and OSHA (2001) standards. After the plan has been developed the employer shall provide safety training for all employees. The employer will also need to determine the necessary equipment to deal with the hazards in the environment to ensure the safety of everyone. Additionally, employees shall attend EAP trainings, familiarize themselves with the audible alarms and procedures to ensure a successful evacuation. Lastly, the EPA must be in plain sight for all to see. Water supply system and water pressure Not all water supply systems are created equally. While there are several different water supply systems and designs depending on the application, they all have one thing in common, they all need water. The NFPA 13 Standard is the Installation of Sprinkler Systems and should be used when installing a fire system. The code covers the requirements for designing a sprinkler system to
FIRE PROTECTION DETECTION & SUPPRESSION STSTEMS 11 protect structures, this includes the needed water flow for the area as well as the accepted testing methods. The needed water for firefighting includes the rate of flow, the residual pressure, the flow durations, and the total quantity of water needed for an area (Klaus, M. J. 2013). Water-flow is interchangeable with fire-flow, fire-flow is the flow rate of water supplied, measured at 20 PSI that’s available for firefighting. When determining fire flow rates for water systems we can use national or international calculations depending on the system. Calculation methods include the Insurance Service Office (ISO) that focuses on basic calculations that look to determine the needed fire flow in gallons per minute, factoring in the type of structure, the size, the occupancy and the area surrounding the property. The National Fire Academy (NFA) uses calculations that look at the needed flow by length and width of the overall floor-plan and multiplied by the number of floors of the structure. Both methods determine the necessary flow rates needed and are necessary in installing a water-system.

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