Directly connected networks have an ad of 0 static

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The reason for this is the Administrative Distance (AD) assigned to each type of route. Directly connected networks have an AD of 0, static routes an AD of 1, and dynamic routes much higher numbers depending upon the type of dynamic routing protocol being used.
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The lower the number the higher the priority. Therefore, the highest priority would go to directly connected networks (AD 0), then static routes (AD 1) and finally dynamic routing protocols. When a data packet comes into the router and it checks the “Destination IPv4 network header” to determine which interface it has to send the data packet out, it the destination network matches a directly connected network, it goes out the interface for that directly connected network. If the destination IPv4 network match a static route (manual route), it goes out the interface assigned to that static route. It the destination network matches an entry from a network learned from a Dynamic Routing Protocol update, it sends it out the interface associated with route learned from the Dynamic Routing Protocol update. If there are multiple interfaces the router can send the data packet out to get the same destination network, it chooses the one with the lowest Cost or Metric. 3. The show ip interface brief command executed on router1 R1 and R2 generated the following output. What would be the static route commands that you would type on R2 in order to reach R1’s subnets. Provide complete configuration command with destination prefixes and next-hop information or exit interface. Assume R1 is already configured. ( 10 points )
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The static IPv4 addresses that need to be added to R2 are 192.168.1.0 and 192.168.2.0. So the static IPv4 commands would be: R2(config)#ip route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 Serial0/3/0 or R2(config)#ip route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.23.1 AND R2(config)#ip route 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 Serial0/3/0 or R2(config)#ip route 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.23.1 OR Default Static route: R2(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 serial0/3/0 or R2(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.23.1
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  • Fall '15
  • network engineer

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