The parthenon was dedicated to athena polias patron

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The Parthenon was dedicated to Athena Polias, patron goddess of Athens It is a doric temple, made of marble, 8 columns wide and 17 deep, developed by  Pheidias The base was slightly curved, called entasis It incorporates ionic attributes such as slender columns and a continuous frieze The measurements are imperfect to allow the architects to avoid strict geometric  perfection and breathe life into their creation The large statue of Athena within the temple was broken up by 200 CE and the temple  was reused as a Christian church, a mosque, and a storage facility that was later  bombarded and partially destroyed by the invading Venetians The Acropolis Construction began on the gateway, or  Propylaea, to the acropolis in 437 BCE and was  designed by the architect Mnesikles Agora: a central marketplace surrounded by a stoa Stoa: the edge of the marketplace marked by a series of columns that acts as an open,  shady porch Served as shelter form the sun as well as the democratic center of the area Few people had right to vote (birthright) and there were many slaves Was the origin of Greek philosophy (stoicism) Located in Athens, which was the most dominant Greek city as of 500 BCE The gate, called the  Propylaia, had a central  intercolumniation, which is a space  between 2 pillars that is larger than average Contained rooms for relaxing after climbing the hill as well as one of the first art galleries Upon entering the Parthenon, the visitor was able to see a statue of Athena Promachos  slightly left of center, and the Parthenon towards the back slightly right of center Also on the acropolis was the small temple of Athena Nike built in the 420’s as well as  the more complex form of the Erechtheion built between 421 and 407 The Erechtheion was said to be the spot where Athena and Poseidon battled for control  over Athens
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Greeks 21:45 Caryatid: statues of women used as pillars Used in the Porch of the Maidens on the side of the Erechtheion Were meant to be replications of the women of a city state named Caria, who were enslaved after the men of the city sided with an enemy army
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The Romans 21:45 The Romans In the 1 st  and 2 nd  centuries CE, the Romans created an empire that absorbed the  Etruscans, Greeks, Egyptians, as well as other people and created a largely  homogenous style of architecture Patricians: landed aristocracy Plebeians: free citizens Expanded on the basic structures of the arch, vault, and dome to build many of their  structures Buildings comprised of these curved shapes can be easily made with smaller stones, 
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