There are plenty of different options from which you can choose Your physical

There are plenty of different options from which you

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There are plenty of different options from which you can choose:Your physical surroundings the day of the presentation will, in part, determine the type of visual aids you can use. You Can Be a Prop, TooFeel like something’s missing? What’s the one thing the list of visual aids on the previous screen did not include?You! Ah yes, you, too, can serve as a highly effective visual aid. For certain topics, you can use yourself as a prop.In the speaker’s role you can be a good visual aid for topics such as the following:With all the other options available, don’t forget the most versatile visual aid, and one that’s always available in your time slot—“Me, myself, and I.” ObjectsLet’s take a closer look at each of your visual aid options. First, objects:Using objects to punctuate your key points can clarify ideas. The downside of objects is that many are unavailable, too large, or too small to bring to a presentation.For example, if you were speaking on new military vehicles, it would be difficult to actually bring one to show. Similarly, bringing microchips for a talk on computer technological advances wouldn’t be much visual help. Cases like these call for different visual aid options. Models, Photos, Transparencies, and VideoDepending on your topic, you might decide on a model. There are life-sized models, such as replicas of the human body and various organs for teaching purposes or copies of rare musical instruments. More common are scaled-down models of much larger objects. On the other hand, as in the case of microchips, a larger-than-life model may be helpful for your audience.Drawings and GraphsDrawings and graphs also work well as transparencies.A drawing can offer a refreshing alternative to photographs. For example, you might use a diagram of a car engine, a courtroom artist’s sketch, or a map of Germany during the Cold War. You can create drawings to highlight specific aspects of your speech, which is an excellent way of keeping your listeners engaged.
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A graph, on the other hand, is helpful if you use statistics in your speech or if you draw numeric comparisons. There are many different types of graphs you can use. Your choice will depend on the topic at hand.For example, if you give a persuasive speech on alternative fuel vehicles, you may decide to show a linegraphof rising gasoline prices, such as the one on this screen.Pie Graphs, Bar Graphs, and ChartsAnother visual aid option is the pie graph. Pie graphs can really enhance your speech by showing how parts of a whole are distributed.Guidelines for PreparationWhen you write your presentation outline for your speech, you should think about where and how to use visual or multimedia aids. Although it may seem overwhelming at first, given the multitude of possibilities, consider the following guidelines to keep yourself focused: Preparation Standards and ColorsHere are some guidelines relating to standards and colors.The human eye was designed with color in mind. Use this to your advantage, but don’t abuse it. A speech is not the time to go wild with color.
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