Line 401 oedipus refuses to believe him and mocks him

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are the curse, the corruption of the land!” (line 401), Oedipus refuses to believe him and mocks him for his blindness. Tiresias’s response to such arrogance is: You mock my blindness? Let me tell you this. / you with your precious eyes, / you’re blind to the corruption of your life, / to the house you live in, those you live with— / who are your parents? … darkness shrouding / your eyes that now can see the light! (lines 469-479)In answer, Tiresias basically taunts Oedipus with the knowledge that for all that Oedipus claims to know and see he cannot see his own life in front of him. Once Oedipus finally comes to see and understand the truth, he acknowledges and laments the fact that all of his problems were caused by his own actions and deeds. He bewails that the use of his eyes told him nothing as
even with them he could not see the truth. “I did it all myself! / What good were eyes to me? / Nothing I could see could bring me joy” (lines 1471-1473). When speaking to his daughters during his final goodbyes, he tells them of his shame and in the same instance asks that they continue to love him. “Come to these hands of mine, / your brother’s hands, your own father’s hands / that served his once bright eyes so well— / that made them blind” (lines 1621-1624). This is a very powerful scene. Oedipus, with his blinded eyes and miserable countenance, who knows that he is to be banished from Thebes for what he has done, still loves his children even though they are a reminder of the fact that he had lain with his own mother. At the very end of the play, Creon tells Oedipus that: Time is the great healer, you will see (line 1664). Actually no he will not. While time heals a great many wounds nothing can heal gouged out eyes. Also, the horrendous acts that Oedipus had committed will never be softened by time. Forever will they remain just as horrid as they were in the beginning. The beauty of this play is that throughout the majority of it, the protagonist does not know the truth and that everyone knows before him. The priest enquires of Oedipus, “what do you know?” (line 54). The answer to that is nothing and this is the start of that theme. Oedipus unknowingly makes the majority of the comments about the horrendous acts he has committed. For example: Well I know / you are sick to death, all of you, / but sick as you are, not one is sick as I (lines 71-73). All he is meaning to acknowledge is that as the king of Thebes he not only suffers like the everyday citizen but he also feels the suffering of the people due to the fact that he is king. However, Oedipus is sicker than he knows and the audience acknowledges the dramatic irony that this line depicts.
Once Oedipus realizes that the prophesy did come to pass, that he will kill his own father and marry his mother, he knows that from the very beginning of his conception he was cursed.

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