Digital imaging strategy fishers digital strategy was

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Digital Imaging Strategy Fisher’s digital strategy was to create greater coherence among Kodak’s multiple digital projects, in part through creating a single digital projects division headed by newly hired Carl Gustin (previously with Apple Computer and DEC). Having established greater coherence, Fisher’s digital strategy emphasized three key themes. 1. An incremental approach. “The future is not some harebrained scheme of the digital Information Highway or something. It is a step-by-step progression of enhancing photography using digital technology,” declared
Fisher. This recognition that digital imaging was an evolutionary rather than a revolutionary change would be the key to Kodak’s ability to build a strong position in digital technology. If photography was to switch rapidly from the traditional chemical-based technology to a wholly-digital technology where customers took digital pictures, downloaded then on to their computers, edited then, transmitted them through the internet to be viewed electronically, then undoubtedly Kodak would face an extremely difficult time. Apart from Kodak’s positions in digital cameras and picture editing software, most of this digital chain was in the hands of computer hardware and software companies. However, fortunately for Kodak, the whole of the 1990s and the early part of the next decade featured only selective incursions of digital technology into traditional photographic imaging. During the 1990s, digital cameras achieved only limited market penetration, the vast majority of photographic images were still captured on traditional film. The critical advantages of digital imaging were in image manipulation and image transmission. Hence, central to Kodak’s strategy was a hybrid approach where Kodak introduced those aspects of digital imaging that could offer truly enhanced functionality for users. Thus, in the consumer market, Kodak recognized that image capture would continue to be dominated by traditional film for some time—digital cameras did not offer the same sharpness of resolution as conventional photography. However, digital imaging offered the potential for image manipulation and transmission that were quite beyond traditional photography. This hybrid approach involved Kodak in providing facilities in retail outlets for digitizing and editing images from conventional photographs, then storing, transmitting and printing these digital images. Kodak’s first walk-up, self-service systems were its CopyPrint Station and Digital Enhancement Station. In 1994, Kodak launched its Picture Maker which allowed digital prints to be made from either conventional photo prints or from a variety of digital inputs. Picture Maker allowed customers to edit their images (zoom, crop, eliminate red-eye, and add text), and print them in a variety of formats. By the end of 2000, some 30,000 retail locations worldwide offered Picture Maker facilities. The internet offered the potential for image storage and image transmission both from retail kiosks and from home PCs. In 1998,

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