If you feel faint lie down or sit down and place your

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If you feel faint, lie down or sit down and place your head between your knees. If someone else faints, position the person on his or her back with legs elevated 8 to 12 inches above the heart unless you suspect head or neck injury. Do not place a pillow under the person’s head. This can block airflow. Loosen any tight clothing. Sponge the person’s face with water. Do not splash water on the face; this may cause the person to choke. If the person vomits, quickly roll him or her into the recovery position shown in Figure 28.7 to prevent choking. If the person fails to revive promptly, seek medical help. nconsciousness 751 Lesson 3 Responding to Common Emergencies T HE R ECOVERY P OSITION The recovery position is the safest placement for an unconscious person because the airway is protected. Put the person in the recovery position only if no spinal or head injury is suspected. This position helps an unconscious person breathe and allows fluids such as blood and vomit to drain. Do not move a person if you suspect spinal or head injuries. Movement can worsen these injuries. Citizenship. If you see someone who has just suffered an injury, don’t assume that someone else will stop and help. Everyone else might be making that same assumption. Be a responsible member of your community. If you see someone who needs medical assistance, do what you can to help, even if all you can do is call 911.
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Concussion A is a jarring injury to the brain that affects normal brain function. Even if there are no external signs of injury, the brain can strike the inside of the skull and be damaged. To avoid causing spinal injury, do not move an unconscious victim if you suspect a head injury or concussion. Check the person’s airway, breathing, and circulation, and get professional medical help immediately. If you suspect that a person has a concussion: Have a conscious victim lie down. Use first aid for any bleeding. If the victim is unconscious and you do not suspect head or neck injury, place him or her in the recovery position, as shown in Figure 28.7 on page 751. Call 911 immediately. Animal Bites ne of the most serious possible consequences of an animal O bite is rabies, a viral disease of the nervous system that if left untreated eventually causes paralysis and death. There is no cure for rabies after symptoms develop. However, if a person is vacci- nated promptly after being bitten, he or she can develop immunity before symptoms appear. When someone is bitten, report the incident to your community health department or animal control department. It’s important to determine whether the animal has rabies. If you find the animal, do not try to capture it. Give its description and location to the proper authorities or the police. The animal will be captured for testing and observation.
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