anterior region the teeth are placed in an edge to edge position and the

Anterior region the teeth are placed in an edge to

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anterior region, the teeth are placed in an edge-to- edge position and the circular motion is continued. Children adapt to this technique rather quickly. There are many powered toothbrushes available on the market. There are also less expensive battery-powered toothbrushes available for patients to try. Studies have shown powered toothbrushes are an excellent tool for all patients, particularly those with low manual dexterity or physical limitations. The larger handle is ideal for patients who cannot grip the smaller manual toothbrush handles, such as patients with arthritis or stroke victims. The patient should be encouraged to try both manual and powered toothbrushes and determine which is best for them. However, the patient should be instructed to use the new toothbrush for at least four weeks. It takes approximately 30 days for someone to develop a habit. Trying new dental products requires time to adapt to new habits. Figure 12. Modified Bass Technique Figure 13. Fones Technique Image source: TheFreeDictionary’s Medical dictionary
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12 Crest ® Oral-B ® at dentalcare.com Continuing Education Course, Revised August 8, 2012 is gently eased between the teeth with a seesaw motion at the contact point, making sure not to snap the floss and cause trauma to the gingival papilla. Once through the contact area, gently slide the floss up and down the mesial and distal marginal ridges in a C-shape around the tooth directing the floss subgingivally to remove the debris. The spool method (Figures 14 A-C) utilizes a piece of floss approximately 18-24 inches long where the majority of the floss is loosely wound around the middle finger of one hand and a small amount of floss around the middle finger of the opposite hand. The same procedure is followed as the loop method when positioning the floss interproximally. After each marginal ridge is cleaned, the used floss is moved or spooled to the other hand until all supragingival and subgingival areas have been cleaned, including the distal areas of the posterior teeth. Patients with fixed prosthesis such as bridges, orthodontics, and bonded orthodontic retainers should be encouraged to use floss threaders (Figures 15 and 16) to remove debris. The floss is threaded underneath the prosthetic to remove any debris caught underneath. Patients should be instructed on their use and again asked to demonstrate to the dental professional that they understand and know how to use it. Floss holders (Figure 17) are an alternative if the patient has difficulty flossing manually or for a patient with large hands, physical limitations, a strong gag reflex, or low motivation for traditional flossing. A floss holder is a good alternative to not flossing at all and should be shown to patients as a means of removing plaque. Figure 14B. Gently follow the curves of your teeth. Figure 14C. Be sure to clean beneath the gingiva, but avoid snapping the floss on the gingiva. Figure 14A. Use about 18-24” of floss, leaving an inch or two to work with. Image courtesy of Colgate Figure 15. Figure 16. Figure 17. Floss Holders Image courtesy of flossAwl.com
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