It keeps marriages from breaking up reduces homosexuality makes inmates more

It keeps marriages from breaking up reduces

This preview shows page 84 - 86 out of 170 pages.

Relatively however, this practice of conjugal helps a lot. It keeps marriages from breaking up, reduces homosexuality, makes inmates more cooperative, helps rehabilitate inmates, makes inmates easier to control, and makes inmates work harder. Conjugal Visit in the Philippines In the Philippines, the practice of conjugal visiting was not allowed in the earlier part of its prison system. However, the policy of the government specially the Bureau of Prisons is to-allow the families of some prisoners who attain the status of colonists or trustees to live with them at government expense in penal colonies such as in Davao Prison and Penal Farm Iwahig Prison and Penal Farm, and Sablayan Prison and Penal Farm The colonists and their families are given a piece of land to cultivate and are encouraged to raise poultry and livestock for their own personal use. The colony post- exchange sells their product. When released, the prisoners, if they so desire to live in the colony, are reclassified as homesteaders and are given 6 hectares homestead lot in the Tagumpay and Tanglaw Settlements. Only Iwahig and Davao Prisons and Penal Farms, so far, are operating land settlements where homestead lots are distributed to released prisoners. There are community resources such as, school, church, recreation center, post exchange, hospital and clinics for the colonists and their families. THE PHILIPPINE PRISON SYSTEM Prior to the coming of the Spaniards and immediately soon after their arrival, the penal system of this country was jurisdictionally local and tribal. It consisted mostly of native mores and customs administered by regional chieftains. The more notable ones were those of Datu Sumakwel's - Maragtas Code, Code Kalantiao, Sikatuna and others. The most extensive, the Kalantiao Code was comparable with Greek and Roman laws of the time as well as with their contemporary Spanish and English criminal laws. 84
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Upon the occupation of the Philippines by the Spaniards dating as far back as 1521, and at various later dates when formal occupation of the different villages were effected by the Spanish “conquistadores” the laws which were introduced in the Philippines were the royal decrees, ordinances, rules and regulations for the government of the colonies promulgated by the King of Spain from time to time and later on incorporated into "Recopelacion de las Leyes de India." These were enforced until 1887, when the Penal Code of 1870 of Spain with some minor changes, which were recommended by the Code Committee for the Oversea Provinces (Pronvicas de Ultramar) in order to suit local conditions, were put into effect. By virtue of a Royal Decree of September 4, 1884, the Code thus prepared by the Code Committee was ordered enforced in the Philippines. Some of the objections to the enforcement of the Code were raised by the "Gobierno General" to the Minister of Ultramar, but notwithstanding such objections, in a subsequent Royal Decree dated December 17, 1886, the Code was ordered promulgated. The Penal Code together with the "Ley Engiciamiento Criminal" were then
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