The Misfit however adheres to a moral code that remains consistent and strong

The misfit however adheres to a moral code that

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The Misfit, however, adheres to a moral code that remains consistent and strong. From his experiences as a convicted criminal, he believes that the punishment is always disproportionate to the crime and that the crime, in the end, doesn’t even really matter. He also harbors a genuine bafflement about religion. Whereas the grandmother accepts faith unquestioningly and weakly, the Misfit challenges religious beliefs and thinks deeply about how he should follow them or not follow them. He has chosen to live under the assumption that religion is pointless and adheres to his own kind of religion: “No pleasure but meanness.” His moral code is violent and never wavers, and in the end, his is the one that triumphs. O’Connor and Catholicism Flannery O’Connor’s Catholic upbringing influenced almost all her fiction, often garnering criticism because of her stark, sometimes harsh portrayal of religion. O’Connor’s great-grandparents had been some of the first Catholics to live in Milledgeville, Georgia, and her family stood out in the predominantly Protestant South. O’Connor attended parochial school and frequently went to Mass with her family. Although her stories and novels are often violent and macabre, they are rooted in her belief in
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the mysteries of belief and divinity. Moreover, her characters often face violent or jarring situations that force them into a moment of crisis that awakens or alters their faith. Moments of grace—a Christian idea —are pervasive, such as the grandmother’s moment of grace in “A Good Man Is Hard to Find.” For O’Connor, writing was inextricable from her Christian beliefs, and she believed she wouldn’t be able to write were it not for this background. In a lecture about “A Good Man Is Hard to Find” in 1943, O’Connor said, “Belief, in my own case anyway, is the engine that makes perception operate.” She also attributed her desire to write to her Catholicism, writing once in a letter, “I feel that if I were not a Catholic, I would have no reason to write, no reason to see, no reason ever to feel horrified or even to enjoy anything.” Important Quotations Explained 1. “I found out the crime don’t matter. You can do one thing or you can do another, kill a man or take a tire off his car, because sooner or later you’re going to forget what it was you done and just be punished for it.” Explanation for Quotation 1 >> The Misfit speaks these words near the end of the story, just before sending the children’s mother, the baby, and June Star into the woods to be shot. The Misfit has told the grandmother that he had been punished for a crime that he can’t remember, and this is the lesson he has taken away from it. According to the Misfit’s theory, no matter what the crime, large or small, the punishment will be the same—even if one never remembers what one did. This idea of being punished for an unremembered crime alludes to the Christian belief in original sin. According to Christian theology, all human beings are born sinners for which they will be eternally punished. Only through God’s grace can these people be saved. In this sense, humans “forget” their crime, yet are punished nonetheless, just as the Misfit suggests. The grandmother
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