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FairyTales (Andrea Dworking).pdf

Physically coordinated though unlike his modern

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physically coordinated, though, unlike his modern counterparts, he never falls off his horse or annihilates the wrong village. The truth of it is that he is powerful and good when contrasted with her. The badder she is, the better he is. The deader she is, the better he is. That is one moral of the story, the reason for dual role definition, and the shabby reality of the man as hero. The Husband, the Real Father The desire of men to claim their chil- dren may be the crucial impulse of civi- lized life. George Gilder, Sexual Suicide Mostly they are kings, or noble and rich. They are, again by definition, powerful and good. They are never responsible or held accountable for the evil done by their wicked wives. Most of the time, they do not notice it. There is, of course, no rational basis for considering them either powerful or good. For while they are gov- erning, or kinging, or whatever it is that they do do, their wives are slaughtering and abusing their beloved progeny. But then, in some cultures nonfairy-tale
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Onceuponatime: The Roles 45 fathers simply had their female children killed at birth. Cinderella’s father saw her every day. He saw her picking lentils out of the ashes, dressed in rags, de- graded, insulted. He was a good man. The father o f Hansel and Grethel also had a good heart. When his wife proposed to him that they abandon the children in the forest to starve he protested immedi- ately—“But I really pity the poor children.” 18 When Hansel and Grethel finally escaped the witch and found their way home “they rushed in at the door, and fell on their father’s neck. The man had not had a quiet hour since he left his children in the wood [Hansel, after all, was a boy]; but the wife was dead.” 19 Do not misunderstand —they did not forgive him, for there was nothing to forgive. All malice originated with the woman. He was a good man. Though the fairy-tale father marries the evil woman in the first place, has no emotional connection with his child, does not interact in any meaningful way with her, abandons her and worse does not notice when she is dead and gone, he is a figure of male good. He is the patriarch, and as such he is beyond moral law and hu- man decency. The roles available to women and men are clearly articulated in fairy tales. The characters of each are vividly described, and so are the modes of relationship possible between them. We see that powerful women are bad, and that good women are inert. We see that men are always good, no matter what they do, or do not do. We also have an explicit rendering of the nuclear
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Woman Hating family. In that family, a mother’s love is destructive, murderous. In that family, daughters are objects, ex- pendable. The nuclear family, as we find it delineated in fairy tales, is a paradigm of male being-in-the-world, female evil, and female victimization. It is a crystaliza- tion of sexist culture —the nuclear structure of that culture.
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C H A P T E R 2 Onceuponatime: The Moral of the Story Fuck that to death, the dead are holy, Honor the sisters of your friends.
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  • Fall '18
  • jame smith
  • Fairy tale, Wicked Witch of the West, Onceuponatime

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