Military academies the expansion of reproductive

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military academies; the expansion of reproductive rights in the 1970s and 1980s;and the entry of far more women into the highest ranks of the corporate, legal,and academic worlds, among many others. Fifty years after the start of thewomen's liberation movement, all-male clubs and restaurants are things of thepast, it is against the law for employers to specify whether a job should go to aman or a woman, and more women are earning bachelor's degrees than men.(National Center for Education Statistics, 2012)Second-wave feminism and the women's liberation movement have, however,been criticized for focusing more on the concerns of middle-class white womenthan on those of women of color. (Brenner, M. and Luce, S. 2015) And the EqualRights Amendment, the centerpiece of the movement's agenda in the 1970s,remains an unfulfilled goal.Exercise: Further ReadingsThe following passage is from a scholarly journal article that looks at the strategicmistakes—which stemmed from a misunderstanding of the critical importance ofSouthern support during the amendment process—that led to the defeat of the EqualRights Amendment. Read the passage and then answer the question following it, whichrelates to the author'sthesis statement.
The passage below is excerpted from"Historical Misunderstandings and the Defeat ofthe Equal Rights Amendment", pages 51 to 54. Click on the title of the article to read,download, and print a copy of the text. These readings are provided by the ShapiroLibrary.This reading is required. You will have to log into Shapiro Library with yourSNHU credentials to access this article."The Second Half of the Amendment V Process"Congressional champions of ERA in the early 1970s simply did not expect problemssecuring state approval. Neither Senator Birch Bayh of Indiana nor RepresentativeMartha Griffiths of Michigan, the measure's principal congressional sponsors,anticipated any difficulty in winning ratification for the ERA. "Maybe some other folksthought of it," Bayh later recalled, "I didn't."...A prime reason for such inattention was a misreading of the history of constitutionalamending. Here again ERA supporters focused on the limited data of recent experiencerather than the much larger body of evidence available from taking a longer view. Since1960, in addition to ERA, there had been no fewer than eight major efforts to amend theConstitution. Four amendments were added to the Constitution to deal with poll taxes,participation of the District of Columbia in presidential elections, presidential death ordisability, and suffrage for 18 to 21 year olds. At the same time, other amendmentsfailed that would have limited the power of the Supreme Court, overturned its rulingsregarding legislative apportionment and school prayers, and provided direct popularelection of the president. In every one of these cases, a notable struggle occurred inCongress. Four times when the battle was won, states quickly ratified the amendments,all in less than twenty months. In the other four instances, good reason existed to

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