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Mcpherson does a good job of describing the land

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McPherson does a good job of describing the land claimsagreement process and even outlines the history of Inuit organizational development throughoutthe negotiation period.Where his work is invaluable, however, is the detail with which hedescribes the nature of Crown lands (land held by the Federal Government of Nunavut that areup for negotiation) and the varying degrees of control that the Inuit negotiated for from surfacerights, subsurface rights, co-management and development oversight of natural resources.Hespecifically extols the savvy with which Inuit negotiators and community leaders consultedgeological and environmental experts along with those having traditional knowledge of the landsand their resources form their own communities (McPherson 2003: 271).The subject of co-management and its impact is a theme that Jessica Shadian develops further, after the agreementhas been long implemented in her book,The Politics of Arctic Sovereignty, Oil, ice and InuitGovernance.In it she argues that the Inuit Movement first helped to create and define aninternationally recognized Inuit indigenism, and that is also helped to redefine issues ofsovereignty.The Inuit Movement and the non-governmental structures that it created in the form
39of Inuit organizations at the regional, territorial and international levels helped define Inuitidentity.The Nunavut Land Claims Agreement specifically helped to redefine sovereigntythrough its co-management structures.Further, because the Inuit NGOs worked across scale anddid not seek state-based solutions to either issues of self-determination nor environmental andresource management issues Shadian argues, they have re-written the playbook for global actors(Shadian 2014: 211).Gregory Marchildon and Renee Torgerson analyze the role of the complex organizationalstructures in Nunavut in delivering healthcare in their book,Nuanvut, A Health System Profile.Marchildon and Torgerson actually critique the lack of private, civil-society organizations thatusually assist in the delivery of health services to underserved communities (Marchildon et al2013: 127)This places an even greater burden on the Government of Nunavut to do it all and,they argue, it is further crippled by the fact that so many of the indicators and reference pointsthat they rely upon to measure such service in the South do not exist in Nunavut or such studieshave never been done.They do see role for Inuit organizations in advocating for more culturallyrelevant delivery services and further study and resources.In her article, “The Social Economyand Resource Development in Northern Canada” Brenda Parlee also outlines the socialchallenges for Northern communities that go hand in hand with economic development from thevices that economic expansion, culture change and consumerism bring to the problems inherentwith economic transition (food insecurity etc.).Like Shadian, however, she too looks at the roleof Inuit NGOs in helping to solve some of these local problems.She calls them social economyorganizations and describes the ways in which they are redefining advocacy at the local level(Parlee 2015: 81).

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Term
Summer
Professor
MAGNAYE
Tags
Inuit, Inuit Movement

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