Michael Matthews Bigger Leaner Stronger The Simple Science of Building the Ultimate Male Body.pdf

Based on these two points the calf routine im going

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Based on these two points, the calf routine I’m going to recommend works as follows: • Do 3 calf workouts per week with at least one day in between each. • Do 6 sets per workout. • For the first set, point your toes forward. For the second, point them slightly out (about 20 degrees). For the third set, point them slightly inward. Repeat for the next 3 sets.
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• Use a 2-1-2 rep tempo: 2 seconds to full contraction, a slight pause while contracted, and 2 seconds to release. • Once you hit the top of your rep range with a given weight, add 10 pounds. Here are the workouts: Calf Workout A Standing Calf Raise – 3 sets of 4 to 6 reps Seated Calf Raise – 3 sets of 4 to 6 reps Rest 2 to 3 minutes in between these sets Calf Workout B Leg Press Calf Raise – 3 sets of 8 to 10 reps Donkey Calf Raise (or Leg Press Calf Raise) – 3 sets of 8 to 10 reps Rest 1 to 2 minutes in between these sets Calf Workout C Standing Calf Raise – 3 sets of 12 to 15 reps Seated Calf Raise – 3 sets of 12 to 15 reps Rest 1 minute in between these sets Simple enough. Personally, I do Workout A on Monday, B on Wednesday, and C on Friday. As with all exercises, form is extremely important in calf training. If you shortchange yourself by reducing the range of motion, you’ll find the workouts far less effective. The proper form with these calf exercises is simple: at the bottom of a rep, your heels are as low as they’ll go and you feel a deep stretch in your calves, and at the top of a rep, you’re up on your tippy-toes like a ballerina. Many people simply use too much weight and can’t make it anywhere near as high as they should at the top of their reps and then wonder why their calves never get bigger or stronger. Don’t make the same mistake. A RMS While I think the arms get a bit too much attention in the overall scheme of things, I definitely agree that a physique isn’t complete without big, developed arms. As you probably know, the largest arm muscles are the biceps and triceps, but let’s look at them in a little more detail, as well as the forearms, so we know exactly what we’re training. The biceps (or, formally, biceps brachii) is a two-headed muscle that looks like this:
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You can also see the biceps brachialis, which lies beneath the biceps brachii. While this muscle isn’t nearly as prominent as the biceps brachii when developed, it plays an important role in the overall look of your arms. It looks like a mere “bump” in between the biceps brachii and triceps, but its level of development affects the amount of “peak” your biceps appear to have (ultimately, peak is mostly determined by genetics, but increasing the size of the brachialis can give the appearance of a better peak). The next muscle group to talk about is the triceps, or triceps brachii, which has three heads:
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As you can see, the three heads combine to form the distinctive “horseshoe” that can become quite pronounced when properly developed.
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  • Winter '17
  • Santos O'Neill Garcia
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