Frenchie's emotions stir up his desire to protect Rose prove himself and act like an adult more than anything else For example Frenchie's anger

Frenchie's emotions stir up his desire to protect

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COMING OF AGE 5out on his own—even though he and Rose return to the group, this represents Frenchie's final coming-of-age moment. I took off running, away from the camp, the Council, my family: running toward Rose, who was somewhere beyond the birch-beaded edge of the woods, running towards an idea of home that I was not willing to lose, not even if it meant running away from the family I had already found (Dimaline, 2019, p. 217).Returning to the community with Rose allows Frenchie to see that his relationship with his family members, both chosen and biological, are all crucial players in Frenchie's understanding of the family lineage, community, and culture that inform his sense of self as he matures into adulthood.
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COMING OF AGE 6ReferencesDimaline, C. (2019). The marrow thieves. London: Jacaranda Books Art MusicDimaline, C. (2017). The marrow thieves. Toronto, Ontario: Dancing Cat Books, an imprint of Comorant Books Inc. Schiffer, Jeffery J. (2016). Understanding and Addressing Intergeneration Trauma.
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  • Fall '15
  • dr. tether
  • First Nations, Indigenous peoples of the Americas, Coming of age, Frenchie

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