OEDIPUS Where are they Where in the wide world to find The far faint traces of

Oedipus where are they where in the wide world to

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1. OEDIPUSWhere are they? Where in the wide world to findThe far, faint traces of a bygone crime? 2. OEDIPUSThou lov'st to speak in riddles and dark words.TEIRESIASIn reading riddles who so skilled as thou? 1. OEDIPUS: And on the murderer this curse I lay (On him and all the partners in his guilt):-- Wretch, may he pine in utter wretchedness! And for myself, if with my privity He gain admittance to my hearth, I pray The curse I laid on others fall on me. See that ye give effect to all my hest, For my sake and the god's and for our land, A desert blasted by the wrath of heaven. (244-253) Oedipus’s intense determination to uncover the mystery of Laius’s murder ironically leads him to inadvertently curse himself.
2. OEDIPUS Yea, I am wroth, and will not stint my words, But speak my whole mind. Thou methinks thou art he, Who planned the crime, aye, and performed it too, All save the assassination; and if thou Hadst not been blind, I had been sworn to boot That thou alone didst do the bloody deed. (345-350) Oedipus’s determination to force the unwilling prophet Teiresias to speak blinds him to Teiresias’s potential reasons for reluctance and leads him to falsely accuse the prophet. -Theme of POWER: Power both corrupts and metaphorically blinds characters in the Oedipus the King. As a ruler, Oedipus is arrogant, unperceptive, and downright mean to people around him. Assuming other characters are trying to steal his power, Oedipus doesn't listen to their wisdom. Oedipus’s downfall is only made possible because of his power as king. He suffers because of the power he possesses – the power that allows him to coerce others into speaking and extract the information he needs. QUOTES ON POWER: 1. OEDIPUS Offspring of endless Night, thou hast no power O'er me or any man who sees the sun. TEIRESIAS No, for thy weird is not to fall by me. I leave to Apollo what concerns the god. (374-378) Teiresias suggests that earthly power is irrelevant in the face of divine influence. 2. OEDIPUS Sirrah, what mak'st thou here? Dost thou presume To approach my doors, thou brazen-faced rogue, My murderer and the filcher of my crown? Come, answer this, didst thou detect in me Some touch of cowardice or witlessness, That made thee undertake this enterprise? I seemed forsooth too simple to perceive The serpent stealing on me in the dark, Or else too weak to scotch it when I saw. This _thou_ art witless seeking to possess Without a following or friends the crown, A prize that followers and wealth must win. (530-545) Because of his status and haughtiness, Oedipus assumes that all accusations against him are false and must be intended as a threat to his power.

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