Not only does he kill is wife but he ruins his social

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control you completely. Not only does he kill is wife, but he ruins his social status, and ends up killing himself as well; for he cannot live with the person that he has become. Walter too falls victim to his own hamartia, yet he finds a way back to his true self before it becomes too late. Walter’s character flaw is his pride and his obsession with searching for something more in life. His pride makes him dislikable at the beginning of the play because he constantly wants to be the head of the household and never wants to take orders or suggestions from anyone else. He believes that it should be him who gets to control the insurance money and distribute it to where he sees fit; which just so happens to be his needs in particular. He is constantly complaining about the house he lives in, the job that he has, his lack of money, and the support that he thinks he lacks
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Bordeaux 4 from his family. Nothing in his life seems to satisfy him. His desperate want to start his own company by opening up a liquor store consumes him, mentally and physically. He not only looses his true self along the way, but the investment money as well, which was entrusted to him. Unlike Othello, Walter is strong enough to push past his character flaws. Instead of allowing them to control his emotions and actions, he turns his weakness into a positive. In the beginning he continued to ignore his problems and his pride was working against him. However, by the end of the play when he finally acknowledges his pride, he finds his old self and wins back his family. For example, when he stands up to Lindner by saying, “Well- what I mean is that we come from people who had a lot of pride. I mean– we are very proud people”(pg. 793). He no longer obsesses over having the most money or the best job. Walter finally comes to the realization that life isn’t just about the materialistic things, allowing the play to end on a happy note. Keeping a balanced and stable relationship between husband and wife is another struggle that Othello and Walter encounter. Both men love their wives very much, but the way they deal with their love is quite different. Othello holds his wife, Desdemona, up on a pedestal. He views her as the most pure and perfect thing in his life. That is why he falls so hard when he is instigated to think differently of her. He says, “Ay, let her rot, and perish, and be damned to fight; for she shall not live. No, my heart is turned to stone; I strike it, and it hurts my hand. O! The world hath not a sweeter creature; she might lie by
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